Morning Edition for November 26, 2019 Hear the Morning Edition program for November 26, 2019

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A voter casts a ballot in Louisville, Ky., this month. Long-serving election officials around the country are retiring ahead of the 2020 election, which could be among the most challenging to administer in the country's history. John Sommers II/Getty Images hide caption

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John Sommers II/Getty Images

2020 Election: Secure Your Vote

As 2020 Approaches, Some Experienced Election Officials Head To The Exits

A number of top election officials won't be around next year. Some are retiring after long careers, but others are feeling the strain of an increasingly demanding and politicized job.

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A voter casts a ballot in Louisville, Ky., this month. Long-serving election officials around the country are retiring ahead of the 2020 election, which could be among the most challenging to administer in the country's history. John Sommers II/Getty Images hide caption

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John Sommers II/Getty Images

As 2020 Approaches, Some Experienced Election Officials Head To The Exits

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Lawmakers in the Texas Legislature passed a law intended to protect consumers against surprise medical bills, but loopholes may weaken it before it is enacted. Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images

Law To Protect Patients Against Surprise Medical Bills In Texas Proves Hard To Enact

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Black Bear Sunlight Ascending
Out of This Place II Sunlight Ascending
Bateau Lights At Sea
Blinding Cold, Casket Black Canyons Of Static & Canyonsofstatic
Maps and Mazes Canyons Of Static & Canyonsofstatic
Seventy Three As The Poets Affirm
Erato As The Poets Affirm
Play the Ponies Jo Blankenburg
House of Dalmore Jo Blankenburg

Matthew Braun, a first-year medical student at Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences in Yakima, Wash., says his personal history with opioids will help him care for patients. Jovelle Tamayo for NPR hide caption

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Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

Medical Students Say Their Opioid Experiences Will Shape How They Prescribe

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23.01.2018 AK
Sleepless in Berlin AK
Path of Totality The American Dollar
Carousel The American Dollar
Soothing Laura Marling
Wooden Lines Tristan De Liege
Arches Tristan De Liege
Vaults Tor
Loop Theory Tor
Emersion Lamplighter

The CAPABLE program provides therapy but also offers up practical solutions to help make navigating the home easier. Sarah Szanton (left) got the idea for CAPABLE when she was a nurse practitioner treating homebound seniors. Courtesy of the Heinz Awards hide caption

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Courtesy of the Heinz Awards

Program Offers TLC To Older Adults And Their Homes So They Can Stay Put

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