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Voters in King County, Wash., will have the opportunity to vote on their smartphones in February. It will be the first election in U.S. history in which all eligible voters will be able to vote using their personal devices. Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images

2020 Election: Secure Your Vote

Exclusive: Seattle-Area Voters To Vote By Smartphone In 1st For U.S. Elections

King County, Wash., plans to allow all eligible voters to vote using their smartphones in a February election. It's the largest endeavor so far as online voting slowly expands across the U.S.

Kendra Espinoza, the lead plaintiff in the case, has two daughters attending Stillwater Christian School in Kalispell, Mont. She is an office manager and staff accountant who works extra jobs to pay for her children's tuition. Christopher Duperron/Institute for Justice hide caption

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Christopher Duperron/Institute for Justice

Supreme Court Considers Religious Schools Case

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Voters in King County, Wash., will have the opportunity to vote on their smartphones in February. It will be the first election in U.S. history in which all eligible voters will be able to vote using their personal devices. Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images

Exclusive: Seattle-Area Voters To Vote By Smartphone In 1st For U.S. Elections

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Some of the grounded Boeing 737 MAX airplanes are seen parked in Moses Lake, Wash., in October 2019. David Ryder/Getty Images hide caption

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David Ryder/Getty Images

Boeing 737 Max May Stay Grounded Into Summer

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Andy Madadian is honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on Jan. 17, 2020 in Hollywood, Calif. David Livingston/Getty Images hide caption

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David Livingston/Getty Images

Andy Madadian, The Prince Of Persian Pop, Receives Hollywood Walk Of Fame Star

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Intelligence Community Threats Executive Shelby Pierson told NPR that more nations may attempt more types of interference in the United States. "This isn't a Russia-only problem," she says. Kisha Ravi/NPR hide caption

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Kisha Ravi/NPR

Election Security Boss: Threats To 2020 Are Now Broader, More Diverse

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Many Americans who get overwhelmed by student loan debt are told that student debt can't be erased through bankruptcy. Now more judges and lawyers say that's a myth and bankruptcy can help. Mitch Blunt/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Mitch Blunt/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Myth Busted: Turns Out Bankruptcy Can Wipe Out Student Loan Debt After All

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