Morning Edition for January 28, 2020 Hear the Morning Edition program for January 28, 2020

Morning EditionMorning Edition

In the second season of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, Midge (Rachel Brosnahan) visits the Catskills. Costume designer Donna Zakowska says this outfit "in the boat with a funny lampshade hat" was among her favorites. Amazon Studios hide caption

toggle caption
Amazon Studios

Art & Design

Meet The Designer Who Makes 'Mrs. Maisel' Look So Marvelous

Donna Zakowska has already won two Emmys for her work on The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel — and two of her costumes are in the Smithsonian. Now she's up for an award from the Costume Designers Guild.

City Lights Philanthrope
Float Philanthrope
Dogs Beware of Safety
Step or Stone Beware of Safety
Dust and Disquiet Caspian
Behind the World Balmorhea
Sky Could Undress Balmorhea
Daturas Meniscus
Overhang Meniscus

In the second season of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, Midge (Rachel Brosnahan) visits the Catskills. Costume designer Donna Zakowska says this outfit "in the boat with a funny lampshade hat" was among her favorites. Amazon Studios hide caption

toggle caption
Amazon Studios

Meet The Designer Who Makes 'Mrs. Maisel' Look So Marvelous

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/800055855/800350364" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Best known for the 1997 hit "Flagpole Sitta," Harvey Danger had much more to offer, argues NPR's Stephen Thompson. Scott Gries/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Gries/Getty Images

The Forgotten Wordplay And Songcraft Of Harvey Danger

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/800006092/800350370" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Happiness Writes White Harvey Danger
Piano Fights 65daysofstatic
Empty Space Lapa
Talk to the Bass Lapa
Mystline Nujabes
How You Feel Fat Jon
Andromede Vibes (Ode To Samurai Champloo) Kyo Itachi

Security experts are urging U.S. political candidates to focus more on cybersecurity to avoid embarrassing or damaging hacks. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Olson/Getty Images

2020 Political Campaigns Are Trying To Avoid A 2016-Style Hack

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/799062773/800350376" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Thrill Attune
3b's Attune
Echo Evocativ
Rome Evocativ
Souvlaki Space Station Slowdive

Morning EditionMorning Edition