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Scientists at the Casey Eye Institute, in Portland, Ore., have have injected a harmless virus containing CRISPR gene-editing instructions inside the retinal cells of a patient with a rare form of genetic blindness. KTSDesign/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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KTSDesign/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Shots - Health News

In A 1st, Scientists Use Revolutionary Gene-Editing Tool To Edit Inside A Patient

Doctors used CRISPR to edit genes of cells inside a patient's eye, hoping to restore vision to a person blinded by a rare genetic disorder. A similar strategy might work for some brain diseases.

The Supreme Court hears arguments Wednesday in an abortion case from Louisiana. It's the first major abortion case to come before the court since the 2018 retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Beginning Of The End For Roe? Supreme Court Weighs Louisiana Abortion Law

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Alan Gross makes a statement after arriving back in the United States on Dec. 17, 2014. A U.S. Agency for International Development subcontractor, Gross was imprisoned in Cuba for five years on espionage charges. He told NPR that Sen. Bernie Sanders visited him in detention and remarked that he didn't understand why others criticized Cuba. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Former Prisoner Recalls Sanders Saying, 'I Don't Know What's So Wrong' With Cuba

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Travis Hull says two of his four kids – including Talon, now a high school student – have asthma. Eilís O'Neill /KUOW hide caption

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Eilís O'Neill /KUOW

Students Want To Fix Air Quality For People With Asthma On The Yakama Reservation

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Naaz Mohammad, 21, has become a star in the Netherlands, where she was born. She had to convince her Kurdish parents, who fled their home during the Gulf War three decades ago, to pursue music. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Meet Naaz, The Singer-Songwriter Blending Dutch And Kurdish Identities

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Scientists at the Casey Eye Institute, in Portland, Ore., have have injected a harmless virus containing CRISPR gene-editing instructions inside the retinal cells of a patient with a rare form of genetic blindness. KTSDesign/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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KTSDesign/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

In A 1st, Scientists Use Revolutionary Gene-Editing Tool To Edit Inside A Patient

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The Trump campaign has filed a lawsuit against The Washington Post. Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images

Trump 2020 Sues 'Washington Post,' Days After 'N.Y. Times' Defamation Suit

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Viral particles are colorized purple in this color-enhanced transmission electron micrograph from a COVID-19 patient in the United States. Computer modeling can help epidemiologists predict how and where the illness will move next. Hannah A Bullock and Azaibi Tamin/CDC/Science Source hide caption

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Hannah A Bullock and Azaibi Tamin/CDC/Science Source

How Computer Modeling Of COVID-19's Spread Could Help Fight The Virus

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