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Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin has suggested that if federal jobless benefits are extended, it will be in a different form than the flat $600 per week. Erin Scott/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Erin Scott/Pool/Getty Images

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The End Of $600 Unemployment Benefits Will Hit Millions Of Households And The Economy

Millions of Americans who lost jobs during the pandemic are in danger of having their incomes cut for a second time. The sudden halt in payments would be felt in households and throughout the economy.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin has suggested that if federal jobless benefits are extended, it will be in a different form than the flat $600 per week. Erin Scott/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Erin Scott/Pool/Getty Images

The End Of $600 Unemployment Benefits Will Hit Millions Of Households And The Economy

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A robot introduces itself to patients in Kigali, Rwanda. The robots, used in Rwanda's treatment centers, can screen people for COVID-19 and deliver food and medication, among other tasks. The robots were donated by the United Nations Development Program and the Rwanda Ministry of ICT and Innovation. Cyril Ndegeya/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Cyril Ndegeya/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

Why Rwanda Is Doing Better Than Ohio When It Comes To Controlling COVID-19

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White Fragility is on display in June at the Frugal Bookstore in Boston. Columbia University John McWhorter says author Robin DiAngelo is well-intentioned but that the book ultimately is racist. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Linguist John McWhorter Says 'White Fragility' Is Condescending Toward Black People

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A health care worker talks to a patient in the emergency room at OakBend Medical Center in Richmond, Texas, on July 15. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

Texas Doctor Says Wave Of COVID-19 Cases Hit 'Like A Tsunami'

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When Mitt Romney (right) and his running mate Paul Ryan lost the 2012 presidential race to Barack Obama, it inspired the party to conduct an "autopsy" of what went wrong. Today, some Republicans question that report's value. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Trump Defied The 2013 GOP Autopsy. So Was It A 'Failure'?

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A high-contrast mode makes The Last of Us II more accessible to visually impaired gamers. Sony Entertainment/Naughty Dog hide caption

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Sony Entertainment/Naughty Dog

'The Last Of Us Part II' Presents An Accessible Apocalypse

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Biomarin Pharmaceutical, a California company that makes what could become the first gene therapy for hemophilia, says its drug's price tag might be $3 million per patient. Maciej Frolow/Getty Images hide caption

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Maciej Frolow/Getty Images

Gene Therapy Shows Promise For Hemophilia, But Could Be Most Expensive U.S. Drug Ever

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