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Facebook said the president's claims violated its coronavirus misinformation policy, in a rare departure from the social network's largely hands-off approach to politicians. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

The Coronavirus Crisis

Twitter, Facebook Remove Trump Post Over False Claim About Children And COVID-19

Both social networks said the president's false claims that children are "almost immune" from COVID-19 violated its policy on coronavirus misinformation.

A young Howard Ashman, photographed on the set of his musical Little Shop of Horrors. Disney hide caption

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Disney

A New Documentary Shines A Spotlight On The Lyricist Behind The Disney Renaissance

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Artist Ekene Ijeoma on the set of "Deconstructed Anthems" at Houston's Day For Night Festival in 2017. Katrina Barber /Resnicow and Associates hide caption

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Katrina Barber /Resnicow and Associates

This Audio Portrait Of The 2020 Census Asks: Whose Voices Really Count?

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Facebook said the president's claims violated its coronavirus misinformation policy, in a rare departure from the social network's largely hands-off approach to politicians. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Twitter, Facebook Remove Trump Post Over False Claim About Children And COVID-19

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Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe bows Thursday in front of a memorial to people who were killed in the 1945 atomic bombing of Hiroshima. Philip Fong/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Philip Fong/AFP via Getty Images

Hiroshima Atomic Bombing Raising New Questions 75 Years Later

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Maria Ressa, CEO of the Rappler news site, leaves a Philippine regional trial court after being convicted for cyber libel on June 15. Ressa, a veteran journalist and outspoken critic of President Rodrigo Duterte, is the focus of A Thousand Cuts, a documentary to be released virtually in the U.S. on Aug. 7. Ezra Acayan/Getty Images hide caption

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Ezra Acayan/Getty Images

Philippine Journalist Maria Ressa: 'Journalism Is Activism'

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The extra $600-a-week unemployment benefit has kept jobless people from plummeting into further debt and has allowed for sustained spending, a boon for the struggling economy. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

U.S. Economy On High Alert Over Shaky Future Of Extra Jobless Benefits

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Former Vice President Joe Biden, seen here during a July campaign event in Dunmore, Pa., told reporters that it would be up to the attorney general to decide whether to pursue criminal charges against President Trump once he leaves office. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

WATCH: Biden Says He Wouldn't Stand In The Way Of A Trump Prosecution

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