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A man wearing a protective mask looks at piled-up trash in New York City on April 24. Cities are struggling with collection as the volume of residential garbage surges during the stay-at-home era. Cindy Ord/Getty Images hide caption

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Cindy Ord/Getty Images

The Coronavirus Crisis

'Hard, Dirty Job': Cities Struggle To Clear Garbage Glut In Stay-At-Home World

As people stay at home, they are putting out more trash, from pizza boxes to cardboard delivery boxes. That's putting a big strain on residential garbage collectors.

Introspection Stan Forebee
Expectations Stan Forebee
Worlds To Run (VIP Dub) Kenny Segal
Stood Up Kenny Segal
Andromede Vibes Kyo Itachi
Unshield Arms and Sleepers
Kanada Vintage Arms and Sleepers
Death Is a Door That Opens Joy Wants Eternity
Uriel Joy Wants Eternity
Notorious B.I.G. The Notorious B.I.G. feat. Lil' Kim and Puff Daddy
Juicy Fruit [Fruity Instrumental Mix] Mtume

Demonstrators pray in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on July 8, a day the court ruled that employers with religious objections can decline to provide contraception coverage under the Affordable Care Act. With the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the ACA's future is in doubt. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Future Of The Affordable Care Act In A Supreme Court Without Ginsburg

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A man wearing a protective mask looks at piled-up trash in New York City on April 24. Cities are struggling with collection as the volume of residential garbage surges during the stay-at-home era. Cindy Ord/Getty Images hide caption

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Cindy Ord/Getty Images

'Hard, Dirty Job': Cities Struggle To Clear Garbage Glut In Stay-At-Home World

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April Feverkin
February Feverkin
Above Goldmund
History Goldmund
The Motion Makes Me Last Eluvium
Closer Otto A. Totland

Vaccines for measles-rubella and cervical cancer are administered at a school in Jimbaran, Indonesia. Vaccination rates have dropped during the pandemic. Keyza Widiatmika/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Keyza Widiatmika/NurPhoto via Getty Images

How Bad Has The Pandemic Been For Childhood Vaccinations?

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Signals in the Dusk Portico Quartet
Offset Portico Quartet
September Earth, Wind & Fire

Last Sunday in the park in Nairobi, life was seemingly back to normal in the middle of a pandemic — which didn't appear to hit the country as hard as expected. Eyder Peralta/NPR hide caption

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Eyder Peralta/NPR

Kenya Braced For The Worst. The Worst Didn't Happen. Why?

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