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The FDA said Wednesday that Abbott's BinaxNow test and Quidel's QuickVue can now be sold without a prescription for consumers to test themselves at home. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

The Coronavirus Crisis

FDA Approves 2 Rapid, At-Home COVID Tests

The Food and Drug Administration says Abbott's BinaxNOW test and Quidel's QuickVue can be sold without a prescription.

Reminisce LAKEY INSPIRED
Find A Way LAKEY INSPIRED

Facebook is stepping up its defenses against claims its algorithms favor inflammatory content. Jenny Kane/AP hide caption

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Jenny Kane/AP

Facebook Disputes Claims It Fuels Political Polarization And Extremism

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President Biden unveils his $2 trillion infrastructure measure Wednesday in Pittsburgh. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

$5 Billion For Violence Prevention Is Tucked Into Biden Infrastructure Plan

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Odysea Robohands
Ikigai Robohands
Yaruse Nakio No Beat Number Girl

The FDA said Wednesday that Abbott's BinaxNow test and Quidel's QuickVue can now be sold without a prescription for consumers to test themselves at home. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

FDA Authorizes 2 Rapid, At-Home Coronavirus Tests

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Within the Federal Bureau of Prisons, inmates are asked to "voluntarily" agree to electronic monitoring in order to use the bureau's email system. Above, a prison cell block is seen at the Federal Correctional Institution, El Reno in Oklahoma in 2015. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

When It Comes To Email, Some Prisoners Say Attorney-Client Privilege Has Been Erased

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Bitter Feeling Liam Thomas
Naked Thoughts Liam Thomas
Morse Code Enemies
Gabbi Gabby Enemies
All I Can Do Drop Electric
Adriatic Lanterna

The January siege of the U.S. Capitol is forcing lawmakers and top agency officials to pivot to find out about future threats before individuals and groups with extreme views try to mount new attacks. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

With Focus On Domestic Extremists, Lawmakers Aim To Reorient National Security Agenda

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Crossings Slowly Rolling Camera
Hyperloop Slowly Rolling Camera

Chart: ICE Detention Population Decreasing Sharply Ruth Talbot/NPR hide caption

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Ruth Talbot/NPR

Beyond The Border, Fewer Immigrants Being Locked Up But ICE Still Pays For Empty Beds

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Through the Gap Rob Levit
The Traveler Rob Levit
1st of tha Month Bone Thugs-N-Harmony
I'll Hit the Breaks Yppah
Good Like That Yppah

Michael Schall pours wine in Vini e Olli's dining room which has been turned into a storage space during the pandemic. Camille Petersen hide caption

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Camille Petersen

NYC Restaurants Balance Safety And Financial Pressure To Reopen

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Nightshift yonderling and Feverkin
Trails yonderling
Sides Perfume Genius

Students stand for the Pledge of Allegiance as they return to in-person learning at St. Anthony Catholic High School in California on March 24. Masks and physical distancing are proving to have some major public health benefits, keeping people from getting all kinds of illnesses, not just COVID-19. But it's unclear whether the strict protocols would be worth the drawbacks in the long run. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Should Masking Last Beyond The Pandemic? Flu And Colds Are Down, Spurring A Debate

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U.S. Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg speaks to Amtrak employees Feb. 5 during a visit at Union Station in Washington, D.C. In a Thursday interview with NPR's Morning Edition, he said not making infrastructure investment would be a "threat to American competitiveness." Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Buttigieg Says $2 Trillion Infrastructure Plan Is A 'Common Sense Investment'

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