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A patient in the COVID-19 ICU at Mercy Hospital of Folsom, Calif. is not allowed visitors. For many months during the pandemic, family weren't allowed to visit any hospital patients. Lesley McClurg/KQED hide caption

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Lesley McClurg/KQED

The Coronavirus Crisis

Some Question Whether Hospital Visitation Bans During Pandemic Were Too Strict

For more than a year, people couldn't sit with loved ones as they died in hospitals. Those lonely deaths took a toll on families. Now some doctors are questioning whether the rules were too strict.

Forest On The Sun Thrupence
Rinse Repeat Thrupence
Opening Borders Ending Song Edita Maldonado
No Walls In The West City of the Sun
Everything Everywhere Matters To Everything City of the Sun

Support for Rep. Liz Cheney, seen here on April 20, is crumbling as Rep. Steve Scalise, the second-ranking House Republican, is publicly supporting her ouster from the GOP leadership. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

'History Is Watching': Liz Cheney Doubles Down On Trump Criticism Amid Fallout

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Crossing Asia The American Dollar
Ceasing Bridges Seas of Years
Weaving Cities from Dust Seas of Years
4 Edward Nancy Wilson
Barracuda Heart

Protesters call for stronger eviction protections in January in Sacramento, Calif. A federal appeals court will now decide whether to scrap a federal eviction moratorium from the CDC. Housing groups say renters need more time to qualify for and get rental assistance money. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Judge Strikes Down Federal Eviction Moratorium, Setting Up High-Stakes Appeal

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Owner and founder Jeff Smith in front of what remains of Hourglass' winery and processing facility in California's Napa Valley. He's rebuilding, but wildfires have him rethinking everything about his land and business. Eric Westervelt/NPR hide caption

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Eric Westervelt/NPR

Deepening Drought Holds 'Ominous' Signs For Wildfire Threat In The West

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Aquamarine yonderling
Coastlines yonderling

An election campaign billboard for the Likud party shows its leader, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (left), and opposition party leader Yair Lapid, in Ramat Gan, Israel, days before that country's election in March. The banner reads "Lapid or Netanyahu." Spray paint on Netanyahu's portrait reads, "Go home." Oded Balilty/AP hide caption

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Oded Balilty/AP

Netanyahu Opponent, Yair Lapid, Given 4 Weeks To Form New Government In Israel

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A patient in the COVID-19 ICU at Mercy Hospital of Folsom, Calif. is not allowed visitors. For many months during the pandemic, family weren't allowed to visit any hospital patients. Lesley McClurg/KQED hide caption

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Lesley McClurg/KQED

Some Question Whether Hospital Visitation Bans During Pandemic Were Too Strict

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Silent Scream Hushed
Tomorrow's Rain Hushed
The Motion Makes Me Last Eluvium

COVID-19 patients in the emergency ward of an unidentified hospital on Monday in New Delhi. Dr. Sumit Ray, a hospital critical care chief in the city, says India's health care system is collapsing. Rebecca Conway/Getty Images hide caption

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Rebecca Conway/Getty Images

Doctor In India: Emergency Room Is So Crowded, 'It's Nearly Impossible To Walk'

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Yours DJ Okawari
Starry Sky DJ Okawari
All Day Frameworks
Three Years Frameworks
Sides Perfume Genius

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