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Carbon Monoxide alarms are displayed in a Home Depot store in Illinois. Although there were no deaths from Hurricane Laura, 28 people died in Louisiana and almost all of them once the hurricane passed. The storm left communities without power for weeks. Fourteen of the deaths were caused by carbon monoxide poisoning from unsafe use of emergency generators. Tim Boyle/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Boyle/Getty Images

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A New Hurricane Season Brings A New Threat: Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

More people have died from unsafe use of generators after hurricanes than storm surge since 2017. The National Hurricane Center wants to focus attention on generator safety.

A bicyclist rides past the Olympic rings on Wednesday in Tokyo, where the Olympics are scheduled to kick off on July 23. Eugene Hoshiko/AP hide caption

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Eugene Hoshiko/AP

Olympic Organizers Say They're Ready For COVID-19 Risks, But Japan's Doctors Are Wary

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Sinead O'Connor performs at August Hall in San Francisco, Calif., in February 2020. Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images

Sinéad O'Connor Has A New Memoir ... And No Regrets

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Marissa Lovell had hoped to buy her small Boise, Idaho, rental home until the price shot up by nearly $100,000 amid the coronavirus pandemic. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Homebuyers Squeezed As Western States See Prices Double Or More In Last Decade

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Carbon Monoxide alarms are displayed in a Home Depot store in Illinois. Although there were no deaths from Hurricane Laura, 28 people died in Louisiana and almost all of them once the hurricane passed. The storm left communities without power for weeks. Fourteen of the deaths were caused by carbon monoxide poisoning from unsafe use of emergency generators. Tim Boyle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tim Boyle/Getty Images

A New Hurricane Season Brings A New Threat: Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1000203891/1002018218" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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