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During the War on Drugs, the Brownsville neighborhood in New York City saw some of the highest rates of incarceration in the U.S., as Black and Hispanic men were sent to prison for lengthy prison sentences, often for low-level, nonviolent drug crimes. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The War On Drugs: 50 Years Later

After 50 Years Of The War On Drugs, 'What Good Is It Doing For Us?'

President Nixon called for an "all-out offensive" against drugs and addiction. The U.S. is now rethinking policies that led to mass incarceration and shattered families while drug deaths kept rising.

Fluid Dynamics Deeb
Theme from Endless Sunset Deeb

Kayla Northam's weight topped 300 pounds as a teenager. She'd started to develop diabetes, and liver and joint problems before seeking bariatric surgery about a decade ago at age 18. Kayla Northam hide caption

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Kayla Northam

Bariatric Surgery Works, But Isn't Offered To Most Teens Who Have Severe Obesity

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Golden Hour Broke For Free
Airlanes Run_Return

During the War on Drugs, the Brownsville neighborhood in New York City saw some of the highest rates of incarceration in the U.S., as Black and Hispanic men were sent to prison for lengthy prison sentences, often for low-level, nonviolent drug crimes. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

After 50 Years Of The War On Drugs, 'What Good Is It Doing For Us?'

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You're a Wolf Sea Wolf
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Let's Watch the World Collapse The Burning Paris
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In this March 18, 2021 file photo, Dr. Anthony Fauci testifies during a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Dr. Fauci Says The Risks From The Delta Variant Underscore The Importance Of Vaccines

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Last Night On River Koett
A Walk In The Spring Rain Koett

Apple Daily editor-in-chief Ryan Law is escorted by police to a waiting vehicle outside the entrance of the Apple Daily newspaper offices in Hong Kong on Thursday. ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images

Police Arrest 'Apple Daily' Editors Under Hong Kong Security Law

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Underdark Twisted Psykie
Dark Skies Twisted Psykie
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Solid research has found the vaccines authorized for use against COVID-19 to be safe and effective. But some anti-vaccine activists are mischaracterizing government data to imply the jabs are dangerous. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Anti-Vaccine Activists Use A Federal Database To Spread Fear About COVID Vaccines

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A demonstrator holds a sign in support of the Affordable Care Act in front of the U.S. Supreme Court last November. On Thursday, the justices did just that. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Obamacare Wins For The 3rd Time At The Supreme Court

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