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#FreeBritney activists protest outside the Los Angeles Superior Court during one of Britney Spears' hearings this April. Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images

Arts & Life

Britney Spears Is Headed To Court To Address Her Conservatorship. Here's What To Know

Pop icon Britney Spears is scheduled to speak in court on Wednesday as part of her ongoing conservatorship case. Here's a guide to help understand why she's there and what's going on.

5:21 Nitsua
Riding Clouds Nitsua

Police tape blocks access from a street leading to the building complex where the Capital Gazette is located on June 29, 2018, in Annapolis, Md. The suspect barricaded a back door in an effort to "kill as many people as he could kill," police said. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Jury Selection Begins In Trial Of Gunman Involved In Capital Gazette Shooting

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Great Malevolent Withholder Guilty Ghosts
Begotten Guilty Ghosts
True North You. May. Die. In. The. Desert
Whelved Keno & Tristan de Liege
Transatlantyk Keno & Tristan de Liege
Praxis mouse on the keys
Room mouse on the keys

With in-person shows cancelled, costume designer Ivania Stack has been making personalized coasters to make a little extra money during the pandemic. Courtesy of Ivania Stack hide caption

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Courtesy of Ivania Stack

New Grants Are Available For Arts Groups Sidelined During The Pandemic

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Monticello Farm Lanterna
Resigned Lanterna

Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei receives a shot of COVIran Barekat, an Iranian-produced COVID-19 vaccine, in Tehran on Friday. Office of the Iranian Supreme Leader via AP hide caption

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Office of the Iranian Supreme Leader via AP

Iran's Supreme Leader Got A Locally Made COVID Shot But Vaccine Struggles Persist

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PS AK
New Age AK

#FreeBritney activists protest outside the Los Angeles Superior Court during one of Britney Spears' hearings this April. Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images

Britney Spears Is Headed To Court To Address Her Conservatorship. Here's What To Know

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Perpetual Purpose Damu the Fudgemunk
Get Lost to Be Found Damu the Fudgemunk
It's All Real Pitch Black
American't Christian Scott
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Ruins Portico Quartet
Spinner Portico Quartet
Still Sound Toro y Moi

A man buys multiple copies of the latest Apple Daily newspaper in Hong Kong. Police raided the office of Apple Daily, the city's fierce pro-democracy newspaper, in an operation involving more than 200 officers. Secretary for Security John Lee said the company used "news coverage as a tool" to harm national security, according to local media reports. Anthony Kwan/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Kwan/Getty Images

Hong Kong's Apple Daily To Shut Down This Weekend After Having Its Assets Frozen

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The U.S. Supreme Court sided with students in a case involving a cheerleader who dropped F-bombs on Snapchat while complaining about her school. Mark Tenally/AP hide caption

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Mark Tenally/AP

Supreme Court Rules Cheerleader's F-Bombs Are Protected By The 1st Amendment

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