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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies remotely during a Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee hearing on October 28, 2020. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Technology

Facebook Gets Reprieve As Court Throws Out Major Antitrust Complaints

The decision is a blow to the Federal Trade Commission and 48 state attorneys general, who were pushing for the federal court to break up the social media giant.

David Shadaha, who operates a cart called King of Falafel & Shawarma, takes an order from a customer in Midtown Manhattan, N.Y. Shadaha is back selling food after taking a job as a GrubHub deliveryman during the pandemic. David Gura/NPR hide caption

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David Gura/NPR

Wall Street Bosses Want Their Workers Back. That's Good For The King Of Falafel

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies remotely during a Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee hearing on October 28, 2020. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Facebook Gets Reprieve As Court Throws Out Major Antitrust Complaints

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GOP lawmakers want to amend the Pennsylvania Constitution to include a voter ID requirement. The Pennsylvania Capitol in Harrisburg is seen here in January. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Makela/Getty Images

Pennsylvania Republicans Look To Evade A Veto And Enact Voter ID By Ballot Measure

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The process for investigating the Champlain Towers South collapse will involve trying to reconstruct parts of the building and look for how the critical pieces failed, structural engineering consultant John Pistorino says. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A Structural Engineer Explains How The Florida Condo Collapse Will Be Investigated

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