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Funkadelic is the result of George Clinton flirting with psychedelic music, a style he describes as "loud R&B." Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

50 Years Of NPR

Funkadelic's 'Maggot Brain' At 50: R&B, Psychedelic Rock And A Black Guitarist's Cry

Aiming to make a record that fans would still listen to decades later, George Clinton and Funkadelic mixed R&B, psychedelic rock and a Black guitar hero's cry.

INTERACTIVE: THE JOY GENERATOR — Feeling blah? Science shows you can boost happiness by taking time for small moments of delight. NPR hide caption

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NPR

Why Looking Back On The Past Makes You Feel Better In The Present

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Funkadelic is the result of George Clinton flirting with psychedelic music, a style he describes as "loud R&B." Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Funkadelic's 'Maggot Brain' At 50: R&B, Psychedelic Rock And A Black Guitarist's Cry

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Many Olympic athletes at the Tokyo Summer Games are having to get used to empty stands, the occasional coronavirus quarantine and loneliness. Zhiting Zhang of Team China practices in 3x3 basketball at deserted Aomi Urban Sports Park. Christian Petersen/Getty Images hide caption

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Christian Petersen/Getty Images

A Lonely Olympics For Athletes Competing To Be Champions

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President Biden has signed an executive order that calls for new policies around device repair and how much control manufacturers have over consumers' choices. Ben Margot/AP hide caption

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Ben Margot/AP

President Biden Wants To Make It Easier For You To Get Your Broken Smartphone Fixed

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