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Students and parents walk after a private after-school session in Beijing's Haidian district, where competition is cutthroat for a spot in top schools. Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images

World

Forget Tiger Moms. Now China's 'Chicken Blood' Parents Are Pushing Kids To Succeed

Fierce competition to get children into the top schools has spawned an aggressive parenting culture named for a traditional-medicine treatment in which chicken blood is injected to stimulate energy.

Too Often Distant.lo
Late Distant.lo
Sir Third Gerald Clayton
Unhidden Gerald Clayton
Eastynato Daniel Szabo
Unknown Brigitte Xie
Little Dancing Light Tomoki Miyoshi
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Peace. chromonicci
Aarhus / Reminiscences Anne Müller
Nummer 2 Anne Müller

Students and parents walk after a private after-school session in Beijing's Haidian district, where competition is cutthroat for a spot in top schools. Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images

Forget Tiger Moms. Now China's 'Chicken Blood' Parents Are Pushing Kids To Succeed

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Twenty years after 9/11, the first responders who rushed in to save lives at the World Trade Center suffer higher rates of cancer than the general public. And many have died of cancers linked to the exposure to toxins in the air. But research suggests they're surviving at higher rates too. Gary Hershorn/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Hershorn/Getty Images

9/11 First Responders Face A High Cancer Risk But Are Also More Likely To Survive

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Complications AK
Forest2 Soda Island and Avionics

A crab cake is pictured from Gertrude's Chesapeake Kitchen in Baltimore, where chef John Shields is experimenting with adding tofu to his crab mix. Courtesy of Gertrude's Chesapeake Kitchen hide caption

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Courtesy of Gertrude's Chesapeake Kitchen

Sacrilegious Or Just Economical? Famous Maryland Chef Adds Tofu To His Crab Cakes

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To Be Made As New Man Mountain
Peripheral Drift Man Mountain
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