Morning Edition for October 1, 2021 Hear the Morning Edition program for October 1, 2021

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Force For Truth Nomak
Anger Of The Earth Nomak

Wall Streeters are not only back at their offices, but they are also heading to the airports again, even as many companies continue to keep their workers at home. Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images

Only 'wimps' phone it in: Why Wall Street bankers are hitting the road again

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A man uses his smartphone flashlight to light up his bowl of noodles as he eats breakfast at a restaurant during a blackout in Shenyang, in northeastern China's Liaoning province, Wednesday. People ate breakfast by flashlight and shopkeepers used portable generators as power cuts imposed to meet official conservation goals disrupted manufacturing and daily life. Olivia Zhang/AP hide caption

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Olivia Zhang/AP

Why China has to ration electricity and how that could affect everyone

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Red Light Green Light Phaeleh
Earthbound Phaeleh
1st of tha Month Bone Thugs-N-Harmony

Glenda Lima, a surgical tech at Houston Women's Reproductive Services, performs an ultrasound on a patient on Sept. 30. The patient drove to the clinic from Louisiana, and the ultrasound was to determine whether the woman was less than six weeks pregnant and eligible to have an abortion in Texas, which has enacted the strictest anti-abortion law in the United States. Evelyn Hockstein/Reuters hide caption

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Evelyn Hockstein/Reuters

Doctors say the Texas abortion ban is complicating other types of medical decisions

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Ektachrome / Ectoplasm Guilty Ghosts
Soul to Soul Guilty Ghosts

Jazz singer Tony Bennett and pop star Lady Gaga released their second duet album, Love for Sale, on Oct. 1. Larry Busacca/Getty Images for NARAS hide caption

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Larry Busacca/Getty Images for NARAS

Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga's latest, and likely last, ring-a-ding

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Golden Waves Mokhov
Echo Love Mokhov
Dream Dancing Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga
Anything Goes Brad Mehldau Trio
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You're the Cream in My Coffee Debbie Reynolds
A Cup of Coffee DJ Okawari
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Vittoro Blue Dot Sessions
The Zeppelin Blue Dot Sessions
All the Optimism of Early January Lullatone
Falling Up Florian Hoefner Group
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The new children's nonfiction series I, Witness aims to help young readers grasp world events that might otherwise feel abstract. The books feature first-person accounts co-edited and curated by Dave Eggers. Norton Young Readers hide caption

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Norton Young Readers

'I, Witness' makes world events visceral for young readers

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has expressed confidence that both key pieces of President Biden's domestic agenda — a bipartisan infrastructure bill and a broader spending package — would ultimately be approved by Congress. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Biden and House Democrats unite behind his agenda, but they say more time is needed

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Short Stories of Methuselah Tree Mooncake
The Horizons Mooncake
Friday I'm In Love Walt Ribeiro

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