Morning Edition for October 18, 2021 Hear the Morning Edition program for October 18, 2021

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Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell testifies during a House Financial Services Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 30. Powell's term expires early next year, and President Biden must decide whether to reappoint him. Sarah Silbiger/UPI/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/UPI/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Economy

What's at stake as Biden decides whether to stick with Jerome Powell as Fed chief

President Biden has a big decision to make: Whether to reappoint Jerome Powell to a second term as Federal Reserve chairman or choose someone else for one of the world's most powerful economic jobs.

Garden Kyle McEvoy & Ezzy
Cooper Lake Kyle McEvoy & Ezzy
Refuge Corre
Vast Corre
Good Evening Near the Parenthesis

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell testifies during a House Financial Services Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 30. Powell's term expires early next year, and President Biden must decide whether to reappoint him. Sarah Silbiger/UPI/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/UPI/Bloomberg via Getty Images

What's at stake as Biden decides whether to stick with Jerome Powell as Fed chief

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Aura Vesky and Liam Thomas
Neuanfang AK & Liam Thomas
Lost Orbits Slowly Rolling Camera
You Are the Truth Slowly Rolling Camera

Dr. Jane Goodall in 2019. She has co-authored a new book, The Book Of Hope. Craig Barritt/Getty Images for TIME hide caption

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Craig Barritt/Getty Images for TIME

As Jane Goodall grieves climate change, she finds hope in young people's advocacy

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A Flood of Emotion The Soul's Release
Goodnight The Soul's Release

Chef Zainab learned to cook traditional Afghan food from her mother in Kabul. Biny Alemayehu/Courtesy of Foodhini hide caption

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Biny Alemayehu/Courtesy of Foodhini

She barely made it out of Kabul. Now she's welcoming Afghans with a familiar meal.

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Infinite Tide Monocle Twins
The Road to Life Monocle Twins

The Tribune Tower, the iconic former home of the Chicago Tribune, seen in Chicago, Illinois in 2015. The newspaper lost a quarter of its staff to buyouts after it was acquired by Alden Global Capital in May. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

When this hedge fund buys local newspapers, democracy suffers

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Moonlight Masayoshi Fujita
Tears of Unicorn Masayoshi Fujita
Airlanes Run_Return
Unshield Arms and Sleepers
Kanada Vintage Arms and Sleepers
The Duel Harry Gregson-Williams
La Pénombre Esmerine
Anomaly: Mvt. VI Glenn Kotche, Kronos Quartet

Then-President Donald Trump appears in front of the U.S. Capitol in 2018. Some of his most loyal supporters want him to return to power in Washington as speaker of the House if the Republican Party wins back control next year. Kevin Dietsch-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch-Pool/Getty Images

Just the idea of House Speaker Trump could be a dream or nightmare for each party

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Julie Bargmann, the 2021 Oberlander Prize laureate. Barrett Doherty/The Cultural Landscape Foundation hide caption

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Barrett Doherty/The Cultural Landscape Foundation

She reclaims toxic waste dumps, and she just won a major landscape architecture award

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