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New York ballot measures would authorize lawmakers to enact same-day voter registration and no-excuse absentee voting. Kaz Fantone for NPR hide caption

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Kaz Fantone for NPR

Politics

New York voters have their say on expanding access to the ballot

While other states move to restrict voting, in New York ballot measures would authorize state lawmakers to enact same-day voter registration and no-excuse absentee voting.

Booster shots are now recommended for millions of Americans. Alejandra Villa Loarca/Newsday via Getty Images hide caption

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Alejandra Villa Loarca/Newsday via Getty Images

What you need to know about COVID boosters

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New York ballot measures would authorize lawmakers to enact same-day voter registration and no-excuse absentee voting. Kaz Fantone for NPR hide caption

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Kaz Fantone for NPR

New York voters have their say on expanding access to the ballot

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For years, All in the Family was the most popular show on television. It debuted in 1971. Carroll O'Connor, left, played Archie Bunker. Jean Stapleton played his wife, Edith Bunker. Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann Archive

'All in the Family' is 50 years old. A new book looks at how it changed TV

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Mai Yang, a communicable disease specialist, searches for Angelica, a 27 year-old pregnant woman who tested positive for syphilis, in order to get her treated before she delivers her baby. Talia Herman for ProPublica hide caption

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Talia Herman for ProPublica

Syphilis is resurging in the U.S., a sign of public health's funding crisis

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