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The Supreme Court will hear its first major gun case since 2008. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Law

Gun rights are back at the Supreme Court for the first time in more than a decade

The time long awaited by gun-rights advocates has come, as the conservative court examines how far a state may go in regulating an individual's right to carry a gun outside the home.

Cargo containers sit in stacks at the Port of Los Angeles on Oct. 20 Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP hide caption

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Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP

A tech CEO got big attention for his plan to ease the backlog at Los Angeles ports

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Brenda Cook, Brant Hopkins and Baby Murf of the the National Women's Football League team the Houston Herricanes. January 1979, Safety Valve, Published Monthly By Houston Natural Gas Corp., Original Photo Provided By Brenda Cook, Houston Herricanes hide caption

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January 1979, Safety Valve, Published Monthly By Houston Natural Gas Corp., Original Photo Provided By Brenda Cook, Houston Herricanes

Author Interviews

How sexism and homophobia sidelined the National Women's Football League

7 min

How sexism and homophobia sidelined the National Women's Football League

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The Supreme Court will hear its first major gun case since 2008. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Gun rights are back at the Supreme Court for the first time in more than a decade

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Competing lawn signs are placed outside a polling place Tuesday in Minneapolis. Voters decided not to replace the city's police department with a new Department of Public Safety. The election comes more than a year after George Floyd's death launched a movement to defund or abolish police across the country. Christian Monterrosa/AP hide caption

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Christian Monterrosa/AP

Minneapolis voters reject a measure to replace the city's police department

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