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Shemia Reese holds the racial covenant that was in place for her home in St. Louis, Mo. Michael B. Thomas for NPR hide caption

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Michael B. Thomas for NPR

Investigations

Racial covenants, a relic of the past, are still on the books across the country

Racial covenants made it illegal for Black people to live in white neighborhoods. Now they're illegal, but you might still have one on your home's deed. And they're hard to remove.

Shemia Reese holds the racial covenant that was in place for her home in St. Louis, Mo. Michael B. Thomas for NPR hide caption

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Michael B. Thomas for NPR

Racial covenants, a relic of the past, are still on the books across the country

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Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Ariz., was censured by the House of Representatives and lost his committee assignments after posting a violent video on social media of a character with his image murdering a character with New York Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's image. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Rep. Gosar is censured over an anime video depicting him killing AOC

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Davemaoite, the newly discovered mineral named after a prominent geophysicist, originated from the Earth's lower mantle. Aaron Celestian/Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County hide caption

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Aaron Celestian/Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

New mineral 'davemaoite' made an unlikely journey from the depths of the Earth

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A bag of assorted pills and prescription drugs dropped off for disposal is displayed during the Drug Enforcement Administration's 20th National Prescription Drug Take Back Day earlier this year in Los Angeles. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 100,000 people died of a drug overdose from April 2020 to April 2021. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Drug overdose deaths in the U.S. have topped 100,000 for the first time

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