Morning Edition for January 19, 2022 Hear the Morning Edition program for January 19, 2022

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Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Lawmakers from both parties are stepping up calls to ban members of Congress from trading individual stocks. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Politics

A push to ban members of Congress from trading individual stocks gains momentum

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., doesn't trade stocks, but thinks lawmakers should be able to pick individual stocks. The top House Republican backs a new ban amid a bipartisan push for reform.

Immigration activists rally near the White House on Oct. 7, 2021. The group demonstrated for immigration reform and urged President Biden to authorize a pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrants. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

A year after mobilizing for Biden, young supporters feel let down on immigration

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The recipe for tomato feta pasta that briefly took over TikTok is made up of oven-roasted feta, tomatoes and garlic, which is mixed with pasta and topped with parsley. Carolyn Lessard/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Lessard/AP

'Garbage trends' clog the internet — and they may be here to stay

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Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Lawmakers from both parties are stepping up calls to ban members of Congress from trading individual stocks. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A push to ban members of Congress from trading individual stocks gains momentum

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The island of Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai as imaged by the satellite company Maxar on Jan. 6 (left) and Jan. 18 (right). It was obliterated in a volcanic eruption that scientists estimate was 10 megatons in size. Satellite image ©2022 Maxar Technologies hide caption

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Satellite image ©2022 Maxar Technologies

Science

NASA scientists estimate Tonga blast at 10 megatons

2 min

NASA scientists estimate Tonga blast at 10 megatons

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