Morning Edition for February 3, 2022 Hear the Morning Edition program for February 3, 2022

Morning EditionMorning Edition

Chinese President Xi Jinping (right) meets with the president of the International Olympic Committee, Thomas Bach, in Beijing on Jan. 25. Xi said his country was ready to host a "simple, safe and splendid Winter Olympics." The Olympics formally open on Friday. Zhang Ling/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Zhang Ling/AP

Asia

As the Olympics open, China seeks the limelight, but warns against criticism

As the Winter Olympics begin Friday, China is welcoming the world at a time when Beijing's aggressive foreign policy is creating friction with several other parts of the globe.

David Crosby (from left), Graham Nash and Stephen Stills of Crosby, Stills & Nash onstage in Los Angeles in 2010. They're supporting former bandmate Neil Young in pulling material from Spotify. Kevin Winter/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Winter/Getty Images

David Crosby, Graham Nash and Stephen Stills ask to pull their content from Spotify

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1077653424/1077832528" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chinese President Xi Jinping (right) meets with the president of the International Olympic Committee, Thomas Bach, in Beijing on Jan. 25. Xi said his country was ready to host a "simple, safe and splendid Winter Olympics." The Olympics formally open on Friday. Zhang Ling/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Zhang Ling/AP

As the Olympics open, China seeks the limelight but warns against criticism

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1077787604/1077832534" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The International Space Station is seen from NASA space shuttle Endeavour after the station and shuttle began their post-undocking relative separation in space on May 29, 2011. NASA/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/Getty Images

What will happen to the International Space Station when it is retired?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1077832486/1077832487" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Searching for a song you heard between stories? We've retired music buttons on these pages. Learn more here.

Morning EditionMorning Edition