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Dairy farms that capture methane from their cows' manure can earn valuable pollution-cutting credits through California's Low Carbon Fuel Standard. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Climate

How dairy farmers are cashing in on California's push for cleaner fuel

Big dairy farms are profiting from California's tougher limits on greenhouse emissions. They're getting paid to capture methane from cow manure. But critics say the system subsidizes polluters.

The House committee investigating the U.S. Capitol insurrection subpoenaed former White House trade adviser Peter Navarro on Wednesday, Feb. 9, 2022, seeking to question an ally of former President Donald Trump who promoted false claims of voter fraud in the 2020 election. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Jan. 6 panel subpoenas former Trump White House trade adviser Peter Navarro

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Dairy farms that capture methane from their cows' manure can earn valuable pollution-cutting credits through California's Low Carbon Fuel Standard. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

How dairy farmers are cashing in on California's push for cleaner fuel

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Shamir Bailey. Marcus Maddox/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Marcus Maddox/Courtesy of the artist

On a new album, 'Heterosexuality,' Shamir tackles the trauma of being oneself

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A Trump supporter holds up a "no voter fraud" sign in Arizona in 2020. The accelerating far-right disinformation campaign about a national voter-verification system is taking its toll. Courtney Pedroza/Getty Images hide caption

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Courtney Pedroza/Getty Images

Right-wing conspiracies have a new target: a tool that fights actual voter fraud

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