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To study emotions in animals, scientists need to look beneath feelings to the brain states that produce certain behaviors. Fran Laurendeau/RooM RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Fran Laurendeau/RooM RF/Getty Images

Shots - Health News

In jumpy flies and fiery mice, scientists see the roots of human emotions

Scientists are trying to understand PTSD and other human disorders by studying emotion-related brain circuits in animals, which research suggests may have a lot in common with the human brain.

Chris Smalls, president of the Amazon Labor Union, pauses while walking with supporters as they march at the Amazon distribution center in the Staten Island borough of New York on Oct. 25, 2021. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

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Craig Ruttle/AP

Chris Smalls started Amazon's 1st union. He's now heard from workers at 50 warehouses

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To study emotions in animals, scientists need to look beneath feelings to the brain states that produce certain behaviors. Fran Laurendeau/RooM RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Fran Laurendeau/RooM RF/Getty Images

In jumpy flies and fiery mice, scientists see the roots of human emotions

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Pieter Van Ry, director of the South Platte Renew wastewater treatment facility in Englewood, Colo., stands surrounded by solid-waste separators. Hart Van Denburg/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Hart Van Denburg/Colorado Public Radio

Colorado is moving toward statewide coverage of wastewater surveillance

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El Peso Hero saves civilians in the besieged Ukrainian city of Mariupol in a special edition of Héctor Rodríguez's self-published comic book series. The 18-page issue is free, with text in English, Spanish, Ukrainian and Russian. Héctor Rodríguez hide caption

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Héctor Rodríguez

Mexican American superhero saves Ukrainian civilians in comic book issue

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Graphic novelist George O'Connor treats the Olympians as both a family and as distinct gods and goddesses, each with their own personality. Macmillan Children's Publishing Group / First Second hide caption

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Macmillan Children's Publishing Group / First Second

Graphic novels about Greek gods that don't talk down to kids

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