Morning Edition for April 20, 2022 Hear the Morning Edition program for April 20, 2022

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Education

Student loan borrowers will get help after an NPR report and years of complaints

The U.S. Department of Education unveils a plan to help millions of borrowers who have been hurt and held back by its troubled income-driven repayment plans.

Republican Senate candidate Herschel Walker walks off the stage during a rally featuring former President Donald Trump on Sept. 25 in Perry, Georgia. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Rayford/Getty Images

Republicans confront (or sidestep) abuse accusations against midterm candidates

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A file photo of the Georgia State Capitol in Atlanta. In a sign of the growing influence of conspiracy theories, a bipartisan mental health bill was almost derailed by unfounded accusations. Megan Varner/Getty Images hide caption

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Megan Varner/Getty Images

A mental health bill in Georgia shows how conspiracy theories are affecting politics

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A truck is used to patrol the grounds of the Federal Correctional Complex Terre Haute on July 25, 2019 in Terre Haute, Indiana. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Justice Department works to curb racial bias in deciding who's released from prison

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Zurich is expanding its district heating system, which delivers hot water and steam through underground pipes. With more buildings relying on this system for heat, there's less demand for natural gas. City of Zurich hide caption

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City of Zurich

To fight climate change, and now Russia, too, Zurich turns off natural gas

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