Morning Edition for May 18, 2022 Hear the Morning Edition program for May 18, 2022

Morning EditionMorning Edition

Dinesh D'Souza, seen here at a premiere of one of his films in 2018, has released a new film alleging voter fraud in the 2020 presidential election. Fact checkers have cast doubt on many of the film's claims. Shannon Finney/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Shannon Finney/Getty Images

Investigations

A pro-Trump film suggests its data are so accurate, it solved a murder. That's false

Conservative commentator Dinesh D'Souza's new film "2,000 Mules" alleges massive voter fraud in the 2020 election, but NPR has found the filmmakers made multiple misleading and false claims.

Ukrainian Col. Roman Kostenko stands in a redbrick farmhouse with a gaping hole in one of the walls. This is where Kostenko taught soldiers how to set explosives. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Claire Harbage/NPR

A member of Ukraine's parliament now trains a recon and sabotage unit to fight Russia

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1099680629/1099680630" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Protesters carry images of disappeared people on Mother's Day during an annual march by the mothers of missing people to demand the Mexican government step up efforts to locate the missing and prevent further disappearances, in Mexico City, May 10. Eduardo Verdugo/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eduardo Verdugo/AP

Mexico's official list of missing people passes 100,000, with few cases ever solved

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1099680650/1099680651" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Records from the White House collection are seen in 2010. John Chuldenko hide caption

toggle caption
John Chuldenko

From Pat Boone to the Sex Pistols: Inside the secret White House record collection

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1099680664/1099680665" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dinesh D'Souza, seen here at a premiere of one of his films in 2018, has released a new film alleging voter fraud in the 2020 presidential election. Fact checkers have cast doubt on many of the film's claims. Shannon Finney/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Shannon Finney/Getty Images

A pro-Trump film suggests its data are so accurate, it solved a murder. That's false

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1098787088/1099680699" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Alice Liu, a second-generation owner of Grand Tea and Imports. Camille Petersen for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Camille Petersen for NPR

For businesses in Manhattan's Chinatown, inflation is a tough economic hurdle

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1099487306/1099690493" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Former U.S. President Donald Trump welcomes Hungary Prime Minister Viktor Orban to the White House in 2019. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Here's why American conservatives are heading to Hungary for a big conference

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1099680587/1099680588" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Searching for a song you heard between stories? We've retired music buttons on these pages. Learn more here.

Morning EditionMorning Edition