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The baby-formula shortage has led some to question why the U.S. doesn't provide more support for breastfeeding. Here, a woman breastfeeds her son outside New York City Hall during a 2014 rally to support breastfeeding in public. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Children's Health

The baby formula shortage is prompting calls to increase support for breastfeeding

As parents scramble to find scarce baby formula and the government races to boost production and imports, some advocates say the U.S. should do more to encourage breastfeeding.

The baby-formula shortage has led some to question why the U.S. doesn't provide more support for breastfeeding. Here, a woman breastfeeds her son outside New York City Hall during a 2014 rally to support breastfeeding in public. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images

The baby formula shortage is prompting calls to increase support for breastfeeding

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A worker carries used drink bottles and cans for recycling at a collection point in Brooklyn, New York. Three decades of recycling have so far failed to reduce what we throw away, especially plastics. Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

We never got good at recycling plastic. Some states are trying a new approach

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Celeste Ibarra and her daughter, Aubriella Melchor, who survived the mass shooting on Tuesday, prayed with members of the Journey Riders, Sons of God Motorcycle Club, including Adam Torres (far left) at Murphy USA gas station in Uvalde, Texas. Vanessa Romo/NPR hide caption

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Vanessa Romo/NPR

Uvalde shooting survivors seek comfort anywhere, including in the arms of bikers

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