Morning Edition for June 20, 2022 Hear the Morning Edition program for June 20, 2022

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A plume of smoke from the Black Fire rises over the Gila National Forest. Philip Connors watched the fire grow and creep closer to his fire lookout post. Philip Connors/Philip Connors hide caption

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Philip Connors/Philip Connors

A New Mexico firewatcher describes watching his world burn

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Onlookers react to a performance during a Juneteenth celebration in Times Square, in the Manhattan borough of New York, on Sunday. Alex Kent/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Kent/AFP via Getty Images

How to properly celebrate Juneteenth in the age of commercialization

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Bartees Strange. Luke Piotrowski/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Luke Piotrowski/Courtesy of the artist

Bartees Strange explores his journey from 'Farm to Table'

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A poster showing K-pop group BTS members is displayed at a tourist information center in Seoul on June 15. Global superstars BTS said they are taking time to focus on solo projects, but the company behind the groundbreaking K-pop group said they are not taking a hiatus. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

For BTS fans in South Korea, there's resignation as the band takes a break

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Rep. Elise Stefanik, R-N.Y., leaves a meeting where she was elected House Republican Conference chair on May 14, 2021. Stefanik replaced Rep. Liz Cheney, who voted to impeach former President Trump. Stefanik's loyalty to Trump has roiled a pro-democracy group where she serves on the board. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Elise Stefanik's defense of Trump around Jan. 6 clouds her pro-democracy work abroad

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