Morning Edition for July 26, 2022 Hear the Morning Edition program for July 26, 2022

Morning EditionMorning Edition

Elizabeth and James Weller at their home in Houston two months after losing their baby girl due to a premature rupture of membranes. Elizabeth could not receive the medical care she needed until several days later because of a Texas law that banned abortion after six weeks. Julia Robinson for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Julia Robinson for NPR

Shots - Health News

Because of Texas abortion law, her wanted pregnancy became a medical nightmare

New, untested abortion bans have made doctors unsure about treating some pregnancy complications. That's led to life-threatening delays, and trapped families in a limbo of grief and helplessness.

The FDA is trying to make "bivalent" COVID vaccines, which target two different antigens, available as soon as September. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Reformulated COVID vaccine boosters may be available earlier than expected

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1113615330/1113615331" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rep. Neal Dunn, R-Fla., left, and Rep. Al Lawson, D-Fla., join other lawmakers as they depart the House of Representatives for the weekend following votes at the U.S. Capitol on June 15, 2018. Because of redistricting, the two are running against one another in the same district in 2022. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Florida Democratic congressman forced to run against GOP colleague after map battle

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1113615337/1113615338" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Elizabeth and James Weller at their home in Houston two months after losing their baby girl due to a premature rupture of membranes. Elizabeth could not receive the medical care she needed until several days later because of a Texas law that banned abortion after six weeks. Julia Robinson for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Julia Robinson for NPR

Because of Texas abortion law, her wanted pregnancy became a medical nightmare

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1111280165/1113615407" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Searching for a song you heard between stories? We've retired music buttons on these pages. Learn more here.

Morning EditionMorning Edition