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A young boy walks past a painting depicting Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. during a Juneteenth celebration in Los Angeles in 2020. Juneteenth marks the day in 1865 when federal troops arrived in Galveston, Texas, to take control of the state and ensure all enslaved people be freed, more than two years after the Emancipation Proclamation. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

National

Juneteenth, the newest federal holiday, is gaining awareness

Monday marks the Juneteenth holiday — a date commemorating the fall of slavery in the United States. While it's a new federal holiday, it's been celebrated since the 1860s.

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Morning news brief

11 min

Morning news brief

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Virginia Del. Sally Hudson's campaign for state Senate has held informal house parties, including this one in Charlottesville, Va. on June 12. Hudson, a 35-year-old economist, says she'd lead on progressive issues in a state Senate she argues is dominated by older white men. Ben Paviour/VPM hide caption

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Ben Paviour/VPM

For Democrats trying to retake Virginia legislature, fiery primaries are first hurdle

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State courts in every state highlighted on this map have cited cases involving enslaved people in the 1980s or later. Citing Slavery Project, Michigan State University hide caption

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Citing Slavery Project, Michigan State University

Slave cases are still cited as good law across the U.S. This team aims to change that

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The FDA cautions that prescription testosterone is only approved for men who have low testosterone due to certain medical conditions. Wladimir Bulgar/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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Wladimir Bulgar/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

Testosterone is probably safe for your heart. But it can't stop 'manopause'

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A young boy walks past a painting depicting Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. during a Juneteenth celebration in Los Angeles in 2020. Juneteenth marks the day in 1865 when federal troops arrived in Galveston, Texas, to take control of the state and ensure all enslaved people be freed, more than two years after the Emancipation Proclamation. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Juneteenth, the newest federal holiday, is gaining awareness

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David Jones dusts his house almost daily because the air in his neighborhood is so polluted. "You wake up in the morning and your throat hurts," he says. He is one of millions of people in the United States who live with dangerous air pollution, including gasses and particulates so small that they can worm their way deep into one's lungs and even cross into the brain. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

A new satellite could help clean up the air in America's most polluted neighborhoods

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