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Parents Against Bad Books co-founder Carolyn Harrison (center) talks with people last month outside the public library in Idaho Falls, Idaho, about what she considers obscene books on the shelves. Kim Raff for NPR hide caption

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Kim Raff for NPR

National

In the battle over books, who gets to decide what's age-appropriate at libraries?

There are efforts to change how decisions are made about which books libraries should stock and which section they belong in. Some advocate using a national rating system like the one used for movies.

Middle East

Morning news brief

11 min

Morning news brief

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Jon Batiste unveiled his first symphonic composition, American Symphony, at New York's Carnegie Hall on September 22, 2022. An eponymous documentary by Matthew Heineman follows his life with his wife. Netflix hide caption

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Netflix

Jon Batiste and Suleika Jaouad share journey of 'two extremes' in American Symphony

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When the Center for Reproductive Rights first announced the lawsuit against Texas in March, there were five patient plaintiffs. Now there are 20. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Texas abortion case heard before state's highest court, as more women join lawsuit

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Parents Against Bad Books co-founder Carolyn Harrison (center) talks with people last month outside the public library in Idaho Falls, Idaho, about what she considers obscene books on the shelves. Kim Raff for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kim Raff for NPR

In the battle over books, who gets to decide what's age-appropriate at libraries?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1214523941/1215512770" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

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