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The cargo ship Dali sits in the water, surrounded by four concrete dolphins, after running into and collapsing the Francis Scott Key Bridge on March 26, 2024, in Baltimore. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Investigations

Concrete structures meant to protect Baltimore bridge appear unchanged for decades

Experts said if the Key Bridge had been fitted with more robust collision-prevention structures, the collapse might have been avoided. Records indicate the protections weren't significantly altered.

Middle East

Morning news brief

11 min

Morning news brief

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Early in life, Sam (left) and John were much more similar than they may seem today. "They both did not wave, they didn't respond to their name, they both had a lot of repetitive movements," says their mother, Kim Leaird. Jodi Hilton for NPR hide caption

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Jodi Hilton for NPR

These identical twins both grew up with autism, but took very different paths

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The cargo ship Dali sits in the water, surrounded by four concrete dolphins, after running into and collapsing the Francis Scott Key Bridge on March 26, 2024, in Baltimore. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Investigations

Concrete structures meant to protect Baltimore bridge appear unchanged for decades

3 min

Concrete structures meant to protect Baltimore bridge appear unchanged for decades

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Reading glasses are easy to come by in Western countries. But getting a pair in the Global South can be a challenge. A new study shows the surprising benefits that a pair of specs can bring. Maica/Getty Images hide caption

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Maica/Getty Images

Glasses aren't just good for your eyes. They can be a boon to income, too

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