Morning Edition for April 11, 2024 Hear the Morning Edition program for April 11, 2024

Morning EditionMorning Edition

Posters of some of those kidnapped by Hamas in Israel are displayed on a pole in Manhattan. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

National

Most doxxing campaigns only last a few days. But the effects can be felt for months

Doxxing campaigns have been used to "name and shame" people who have expressed opinions about the Israel-Hamas war.

Asia

Morning news brief

11 min

Morning news brief

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1244042210/1244048916" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An aerial view taken on March 9, 2023, shows Thitu Island in the South China Sea. Jam Sta Rosa/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jam Sta Rosa/AFP via Getty Images

On a remote island, a test of wills between the Philippines and China

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1242978053/1244042310" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Posters of some of those kidnapped by Hamas in Israel are displayed on a pole in Manhattan. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Most doxxing campaigns only last a few days. But the effects can be felt for months

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1231084790/1244042316" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Hilary Fung/NPR/Myers Abortion Facility Database

Shots - Health News

How Florida and Arizona Supreme Court rulings change the abortion access map

3 min

How Florida and Arizona Supreme Court rulings change the abortion access map

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1243991410/1244042322" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

During spawning corals release their eggs and sperm, filling the water like confetti, which combine to create the next generation of reef builders. Marie Roman/AIMS hide caption

toggle caption
Marie Roman/AIMS

Scientists are breeding 'super corals.' Can they withstand climate change?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1241431817/1244042328" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Searching for a song you heard between stories? We've retired music buttons on these pages. Learn more here.

Morning EditionMorning Edition