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Earlier this month, Dr. Sadiqu al-Mousllie, accompanied by his family and a few members of their mosque, stood in downtown Braunschweig, Germany, and held up signs that read: "I am a Moslem. What would you like to know?" in an effort to promote dialogue between Muslims and non-Muslims. Courtesy of Sarah Mousllie hide caption

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Courtesy of Sarah Mousllie

Parallels

A German Muslim Asks His Compatriots: 'What Do You Want To Know?'

Inside his dentist's office, Sadiqu al-Mousllie is treated like any other German. It's different when the Syrian-born man steps outside. He's trying to fight Islamophobia, one question at a time.

Art Clay, 78, of Chicago takes a run in a light snowfall on Wednesday. Clay is a co-founder of the National Brotherhood of Skiers. Sonya Doctorian for NPR hide caption

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Sonya Doctorian for NPR

'The Black Summit' Draws African-American Skiers And Boarders To Aspen

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Students Patrick Rohrer, Sarah Warthen, Alix Piven and Lauren Urane are led by Mercyhurst University Archeologist Andy Hemmings. Their project has picked up where Florida's State Geologist Elias Sellards left off in 1915. Sellards led an excavation of the site where workers digging a drainage canal found fossilized human remains. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Can You Dig It? More Evidence Suggests Humans From The Ice Age

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Kazuo Ishiguro is also the author of The Remains of the Day and Never Let Me Go. Jeff Cottenden/Courtesy of Knopf hide caption

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Jeff Cottenden/Courtesy of Knopf

The Persistence — And Impermanence — Of Memory In 'The Buried Giant'

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Tom Brosseau's latest album is Perfect Abandon. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Feet On The Coast, Mind On The Prairie: Tom Brosseau's Rootless Sound

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Mohsin Hamid is also the author of three novels, How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia, The Reluctant Fundamentalist and Moth Smoke. Jillian Edelstein/CAMERA PRESS hide caption

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Jillian Edelstein/CAMERA PRESS

Pakistani Author Mohsin Hamid And His Roving 'Discontent'

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Earlier this month, Dr. Sadiqu al-Mousllie, accompanied by his family and a few members of their mosque, stood in downtown Braunschweig, Germany, and held up signs that read: "I am a Moslem. What would you like to know?" in an effort to promote dialogue between Muslims and non-Muslims. Courtesy of Sarah Mousllie hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Sarah Mousllie

A German Muslim Asks His Compatriots: 'What Do You Want To Know?'

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Construction workers at the Erbil Citadel, which was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site last year. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

After 6,000 Years, Time For A Renovation At Iraq's Citadel

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Park Ranger Mike Evans at the Castillo de San Marcos says the Spanish were roping cattle and pruning their citrus groves in St. Augustine before the British even set sail for Jamestown. Peter Haden/NPR hide caption

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Peter Haden/NPR

Not So Fast, Jamestown: St. Augustine Was Here First

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