Weekend Edition Sunday for December 5, 2010 Hear the Weekend Edition Sunday program for December 5, 2010

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A tiny statue of Bo, the Obama's dog, sits in front of a  White House replica made out of chocolate and gingerbread. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

At The White House, It's All Ribbons And Bo

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Jeff Lukken, the mayor of LaGrange, Ga., says Kia Motors has brought thousands of jobs to Troup County at a time when the recession hit hard. The unemployment rate in the region is above 11 percent. Kathy Lohr/NPR hide caption

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Kathy Lohr/NPR

Kia Motors' Hires Boost Economy, Spirits In Georgia

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Climate scientists and environmental advocates face an uphill battle as more Americans deny that global warming is real despite scientific evidence to the contrary. Here, a Greenpeace member checks the inside of a hot air balloon before it's launched in Cancun, Mexico. Luis Perez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Perez/AFP/Getty Images

Climate Groups Retool Argument For Global Warming

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Box Office Mojo? Donnell Alexander's short film has gotten plenty of attention -- from everybody except the Hollywood money. Antonio Olmos hide caption

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Antonio Olmos

In Hollywood, An Urban Legend Worth A Fact-Check

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Charley Willis and his wife, Laura, in the late 1800s. Willis is credited with the original version of the classic cowboy song "Goodbye Old Paint." Courtesy of Franklin Willis hide caption

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Courtesy of Franklin Willis

Who Were The Cowboys Behind 'Cowboy Songs'?

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