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Cabinet-card portrait of brain-injury survivor Phineas Gage (1823–1860), shown holding the tamping iron that injured him. Wikimedia hide caption

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Shots - Health News

Why Brain Scientists Are Still Obsessed With The Curious Case Of Phineas Gage

In 1848, a railroad worker survived an accident that drove a 13-pound iron bar through his head. The injury changed his personality, and our understanding of the brain.

Cloud eggs: It's not just Instagrammers who find them pretty. Chefs of the 17th century whipped them up, too. Then, as now, they were meant to impress. Maria Godoy/NPR hide caption

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Maria Godoy/NPR

Cloud Eggs: The Latest Instagram Food Fad Is Actually Centuries Old

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Russian President Vladimir Putin chairs a meeting of top executives of the Defense Ministry and military-industrial complex in the Black Sea resort of Sochi, Russia, Friday, May 19, 2017. Mikhail Klimentyev/AP hide caption

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Mikhail Klimentyev/AP

With Trump In Office, Did The Kremlin Get More Than It Bargained For?

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The Gab.ai home page cites the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Gab.ai/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Gab.ai/Screenshot by NPR

Feeling Sidelined By Mainstream Social Media, Far-Right Users Jump To Gab

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Cabinet-card portrait of brain-injury survivor Phineas Gage (1823–1860), shown holding the tamping iron that injured him. Wikimedia hide caption

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Wikimedia

Why Brain Scientists Are Still Obsessed With The Curious Case Of Phineas Gage

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