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"There's been quite a lot of tension between the way I've chosen to do things and the way a major label expects female pop artists to do things," Charli XCX tells NPR. Emily Lipson hide caption

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Emily Lipson

Music Interviews

'I love selling out': Charli XCX on the volatile pop of 'Crash'

On Charli XCX's Crash, the artist leans fully into a mainstream pop persona for the first time in almost a decade.

Marta Hulievska (center), a freshman at Dartmouth College, is from the southeastern Ukrainian city of Zaporizhzhia. Robert Gill/Dartmouth/Robert Gill hide caption

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Robert Gill/Dartmouth/Robert Gill

Ukrainian students in the U.S. watch a war on their homeland unfold from abroad

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"There's been quite a lot of tension between the way I've chosen to do things and the way a major label expects female pop artists to do things," Charli XCX tells NPR. Emily Lipson hide caption

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Emily Lipson

'I love selling out': Charli XCX on the volatile pop of 'Crash'

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The protagonists of 'Umma,' a new horror film directed by Iris Shim, grapple with the hair-raising effects of integenerational trauma. Saeed Adyani/Sony Pictures Entertainment hide caption

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Saeed Adyani/Sony Pictures Entertainment

In 'Umma,' intergenerational trauma takes on a demonic form

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From March 2019: Volodymyr Zelenskyy takes part in the shooting of the television series Servant of the People, in which he played the role of the President of Ukraine. Then a presidential candidate, art imitated life when he was elected to office. Sergei Supinsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sergei Supinsky/AFP via Getty Images

In 'Servant of the People,' viewers got a glimpse of the future President Zelenskyy

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