Science : 13.7: Cosmos And Culture Sometimes we get so excited about new results that we just have to share them. It may be explaining a new piece of science or revisiting an older result of special significance. Science is all about celebrating discovery and understanding.

Picture shows what scientists say are Neanderthal cave-paintings inside the Andalusian cave of Ardales, on March 1, 2018. The cave-paintings, found in three caves in Spain, were created between 43,000 and 65,000 years ago, at least 20,000 years before modern humans are believed to have arrived in Europe. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

This image, taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, shows the supernova remnant SNR 0509-68.7, also known as N103B. It is located 160,000 light-years from Earth in a neighboring galaxy called the Large Magellanic Cloud. Space Telescope Science Institute/NASA, ESA and Y.-H. Chu (Academia Sinica, Taipei) hide caption

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Space Telescope Science Institute/NASA, ESA and Y.-H. Chu (Academia Sinica, Taipei)

What scientists believe to be our oldest ancestor, the single-celled organism named LUCA, likely lived in extreme conditions where magma met water — in a setting similar to this one from Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Danita Delimont/Getty Images/Gallo Images hide caption

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Danita Delimont/Getty Images/Gallo Images

A Hubble Space Telescope image of the Ant Nebula. Astrophysicist Adam Frank spent last week at an international meeting in Hong Kong trying to understand the science of what these objects tell us about the last gasp of dying stars like the sun. NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team hide caption

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NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team