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Live Coverage: 2022 Primaries

Election results from NPR's nationwide network

Rep. Dan Newhouse, R-Wash., questions Congressional Budget Office Director Phillip Swagel as he testifies during a hearing on Feb. 12, 2020. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

Rep. Dan Newhouse, R-Wash., questions Congressional Budget Office Director Phillip Swagel as he testifies during a hearing on Feb. 12, 2020.

Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

Washington state Rep. Dan Newhouse, one of just 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach then-President Donald Trump in the wake of the Capitol insurrection, has advanced to the general election in the state's 4th Congressional District, according to a race call by The Associated Press.

Newhouse will face Democrat Doug White in November's general election in the solidly Republican district.

Washington's top-two primary system puts all candidates on one ballot and advances the top two vote-getters to the general election, regardless of party.

Newhouse was one of three House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump who was on Tuesday's ballot.

Fellow Washington state member of Congress Jaime Herrera Beutler is looking to advance in the 3rd District; that race hasn't been called, and Herrera Beutler is battling it out for the second spot in the general election with Trump-backed Joe Kent.

And in Michigan, Rep. Peter Meijer was narrowly defeated by former Trump administration official John Gibbs in that state's Grand Rapids-based 3rd District.

As part of his ongoing revenge tour to oust the Republicans who voted to impeach him, Trump endorsed Gibbs, Kent and Loren Culp, who is in third in the 4th District.

Arizona Republican candidate for governor Kari Lake speaks at an election-night gathering in Scottsdale, Ariz., on Tuesday. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Arizona Republican candidate for governor Kari Lake speaks at an election-night gathering in Scottsdale, Ariz., on Tuesday.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

PHOENIX — Two days after polls closed in Arizona, The Associated Press called the Republican primary for governor for former local news anchor Kari Lake, an election-denying new convert to Republican causes.

Former President Donald Trump's preferred candidate bested a field of GOP hopefuls, but the only other real contender was developer Karrin Taylor Robson. By the end of the campaign, the head-to-head race between two candidates — neither of whom had been elected to office before — was defined by who supported them.

In Lake's corner was Trump and a wave of the former president's allies swept up in the false narrative that President Biden stole the election.

Taylor Robson was backed by establishment Republicans, both locally and nationally — including current Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey and former Vice President Mike Pence.

She spent millions of dollars, much of it her own wealth, to brand herself as a more reasonable-sounding Republican, though Taylor Robson's policies don't often differ from Lake. Both have similar talking points when it comes to border security and so-called critical race theory. And Taylor Robson did little to dispel concerns about the 2020 election while she criticized Lake for casting doubt on the integrity of the 2022 vote.

But it wasn't enough to overcome Lake, who took an early lead in polls after Trump's endorsement in September 2021.

Less than two years ago, Lake was still reading the news on television. In March of 2021, she resigned amid a slew of controversial social media posts, including one spreading a debunked video about COVID-19. Months later, she announced her campaign for governor. Much of her campaign was dedicated to repeating the former president's election lies, both old and new — Lake even spent the past few weeks baselessly claiming fraud in Arizona's current vote.

Now she'll face Katie Hobbs, a Democrat who made a name for herself in 2020 for opposite reasons — defending the integrity of the 2020 election as the secretary of state, the top election official in Arizona.

A mural of Rep. John Lewis on a street named after him Feb. 11, in Nashville, Tenn. The late Lewis was part of a movement that marched downtown from the historically Black neighborhood of North Nashville to take part in lunch counter sit-ins. That same neighborhood is redistricted into a mostly white congressional district, which some Democrats are comparing past civil rights violations. John Amis/AP hide caption

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John Amis/AP

A mural of Rep. John Lewis on a street named after him Feb. 11, in Nashville, Tenn. The late Lewis was part of a movement that marched downtown from the historically Black neighborhood of North Nashville to take part in lunch counter sit-ins. That same neighborhood is redistricted into a mostly white congressional district, which some Democrats are comparing past civil rights violations.

John Amis/AP

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Thursday, voters in Nashville won't see their congressman's name on the ballot. Jim Cooper decided to sit out the race after redistricting when GOP lawmakers in the state redrew the boundaries of the 5th Congressional District into three separate districts more likely to elect a Republican than a Democrat, like him.

Cooper, a moderate Democrat, has represented the district for two decades and had survived previous redistricting battles, but the state capital has never been carved up quite like this in its entire history.

"We've been a state capital that spoke for itself for at least 230 years," Cooper said in an interview earlier this year. "We've been Democratic for longer than anybody can count — at least 100 years."

When the Republican-controlled Tennessee legislature gathered to redraw congressional maps earlier this year, they had a goal. They wanted to gain a seat in the U.S. House, so they spliced Davidson County, home to Nashville, into three more rural Republican-leaning districts.

That could dilute the Democratic stronghold just enough to give the GOP another seat on their quest to take back the House this November.

In January, after the maps were approved, Cooper had had enough.

"I know how politics works. I've run probably more than any living politician. And when they stack the deck against you, you're wasting your time," said Cooper.

Democrats argue that Nashville could have been kept whole. Each congressional district in Tennessee needs to have about 767,000 people. Nashville has roughly 715,000, and it's quickly growing, meaning that Republicans could have added one extra mid-size city instead of splitting it into three different districts.

"They very carefully tried to ensure that Davidson County could not necessarily be the predominant power in any of those three," says Kent Syler, a political science professor at Middle Tennessee State University.

Republicans have defended their maps, saying they followed the law. Tennessee House Speaker Cameron Sexton says he thinks the split will help, not hurt Nashville.

"I think Davidson will gain more representation. It never hurts to have more people in Washington fighting for you," says Sexton.

Signs for the top three Republican candidates for Tennessee's 5th Congressional District — Andy Ogles, Beth Harwell and Kurt Winstead — stand amid other placards at a polling site in Nashville, Tenn. Chas Sisk/WPLN hide caption

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Chas Sisk/WPLN

Signs for the top three Republican candidates for Tennessee's 5th Congressional District — Andy Ogles, Beth Harwell and Kurt Winstead — stand amid other placards at a polling site in Nashville, Tenn.

Chas Sisk/WPLN

The Republican candidates

If money talks, then Republican Kurt Winstead's campaign fund is yelling. He's raised $900,000 this cycle, the most of any of the nine GOP candidates running in the 5th District. The retired Tennessee National Guardsman likes to reference his time in the military on the campaign trail, including a time he toured a hospital in Iraq.

Other top fundraisers are Maury County Mayor Andy Ogles and Beth Harwell, Tennessee's first female House speaker.

Harwell has raised a little over $800,000 so far. Ogles has raised $200,000, and he's gotten an additional boost from Super PACs — pouring more than half a million into the race on his behalf.

Former President Donald Trump could be a big factor in this race. He hasn't endorsed any of the current candidates, but in January, he endorsed Morgan Ortagus, who worked in the Trump administration. Ortagus has since been removed from the ballot by the state party.

After being kicked out of the race, Ortagus endorsed Kurt Winstead and joined his campaign. That set up the sort of political jockeying that now has party insiders wondering who might get Trump's blessing.

"Any endorsement he would make, even at this late stage of the game, would be a huge game-changer," says Rick Williams, a conservative political activist and former Davidson County co-chair for Trump's presidential campaign.

With or without the former president's blessing, loyalty to Trumpism is a huge theme in this race. Several candidates still float Trump's false claim that he won the 2020 election. And, when candidates were asked about impeaching President Joe Biden at a debate in Maury County, four of them said they would.

In one district, a progressive takes a chance on the math

Odessa Kelly, a Nashville native, worries that whoever is elected won't be fighting for her. She's Black and gay, and she says these maps will weaken the power of Black and brown voters.

"There is no Republican that can accurately represent me, my values, my morals and my thoughts. There's none. There's zero," says Kelly. "And what they did is tried to dilute that."

Kelly is running as a Democrat in the redesigned District 7. That's probably her best chance. According to Census data, out of the three newly drawn districts in and around Nashville, it has the highest percentage of Black voters — close to 18%.

"I'm not going to lay down and take this," Kelly says. "And neither should anyone else who believes in the fundamental ideas of America where everyone has a right to their voice and a right to be heard. Because that's essentially what they took away."

But it will be an uphill battle. She'll be facing Republican incumbent Mark Green, who is running for his third term.

Tennessee is often referred to as a "red state" politically, but it's more complex than that. In the last presidential election, 60% of the state voted Republican, but they've controlled nearly 80% of U.S. House seats.

And if the Republican's plan goes their way this November, they'll control nearly all of them. Grabbing eight seats, while Democrats would only control one in Memphis.

Abortion-rights supporters cheer as the proposed Kansas constitutional amendment that would allow abortion restrictions in the state fails. They were watching election results at the Kansas for Constitutional Freedom watch party in Overland Park. Dave Kaup/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Dave Kaup/AFP via Getty Images

Abortion-rights supporters cheer as the proposed Kansas constitutional amendment that would allow abortion restrictions in the state fails. They were watching election results at the Kansas for Constitutional Freedom watch party in Overland Park.

Dave Kaup/AFP via Getty Images

Tuesday was the biggest primary day left on the 2022 midterm calendar — and there were some telling results that could have implications for this fall, from the state of abortion rights in this country to the risks to Republicans and Democrats posed by former President Donald Trump's influence.

Here are four takeaways from the results in Arizona, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri and Washington state:

1. Abortion-rights supporters get a major boost.

Voters in Kansas rejected a ballot initiative that would have opened the door to allowing lawmakers to significantly restrict abortion rights in the state. But it didn't just fail, it failed decisively.

It's the first time voters have weighed in on the issue since the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, and it has to be an eye-opener for Republicans. This is conservative Kansas, not New York or California. And it was on the ballot in August because abortion-rights opponents thought it would advantage them with a low-turnout election. But it was no low-turnout affair.

For context, in 2018, only about 450,000 people turned out for the Kansas primary elections. For this ballot measure, it was double. That's about half of Kansas' total registered voters. For a ballot measure in August... wow.

Republican strategists over these last few months have been concerned about how the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe would affect the campaigns. This is going to make them raise some eyebrows with their morning coffee, because this result clearly shows where the energy is on the issue of abortion rights right now.

Now, this was a one-issue race in Kansas, and moderate voters and independents have been saying inflation, gas prices and crime are more important to their vote this fall. But abortion rights has skyrocketed up the list of concerns and engaged a Democratic base that was otherwise depressed.

Republicans were on a glide path to take back the House and potentially the Senate, but abortion-rights supporters now have the potential to help Democrats blunt some of those expected GOP gains in the House and hold the Senate.

2. Trump shows his strength in GOP primaries — again.

In Arizona's key Senate race, Blake Masters won with Trump's endorsement and will face the more moderate Democrat Mark Kelly this fall. Masters is a venture capitalist who has pushed Trump's policies and his election lies.

Masters — who had big financial backing from his friend and mentor, PayPal co-founder Peter Thiel, who poured millions into this race to boost Masters — has said for example, that Democrats "pulled out all the stops" to steal the 2020 presidential election and has suggested this year's midterms might not be on the level.

In the secretary of state's race, a Trump-backed conspiracy theorist and election denier, Mark Finchem, who was on the Capitol grounds on Jan. 6, won the GOP nomination. Finchem is now the sixth election denier across the country to win the Republican nomination for the job that often controls election administration in the states.

Four of those places are key presidential swing states — Michigan, Nevada, New Mexico and, now, Arizona.

The big race for Arizona governor between Trump's preferred candidate, Kari Lake, and Karrin Taylor Robson — who had the backing of former Vice President Mike Pence and outgoing Gov. Doug Ducey — was still too close to call on Wednesday morning.

Polls had shown Lake, also an election denier, ahead, but Lake only leads by a couple thousand votes.

In the Missouri Senate race, state Attorney General Eric Schmitt handily defeated the controversial former Gov. Eric Greitens. The day before this race, Trump endorsed "ERIC." Just "ERIC," no last name. That doesn't count for much except trolling.

In Michigan, Trump got a win with his candidate, John Gibbs, ousting Peter Meijer, one of the 10 Republicans who voted for his impeachment following his conduct on and before the Jan. 6 insurrection. Democrats boosted Gibbs, spending millions to help oust Meijer, thinking it would give them a better shot at winning the seat in a general election.

It's a Machiavellian move that's part of a larger trend for Democrats in these kinds of races and has irritated even some Democratic lawmakers. It worked in the short term in this race, but, if Gibbs — and other candidates like him — wins, it would come back to bite Democrats (more on that below).

Two other Republican Trump impeachers were also on the ballot in Washington state, Reps. Jaime Herrera Beutler and Dan Newhouse. The races have not been called, as only about half the vote was in by Wednesday morning. Both incumbents lead Republican challengers narrowly in primaries where the top two candidates, regardless of party, move on to the general election.

If they hold on, they would join California's David Valadao as the only Trump impeachers left standing. Four others announced their decision not to run for reelection, and Jan. 6 committee vice chair and principal Trump antagonist Liz Cheney faces her fate in two weeks in Wyoming.

And Cheney is in a lot of trouble. The latest NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll found that just 13% of Republicans nationally had a favorable view of her, as compared to 60% of Democrats. That's a tough position in a very conservative state, where Republicans outnumber Democrats five-to-one and that went more heavily for Trump than any other state in 2020.

Cheney has been trying to appeal to Democrats in her state, but that is unlikely to work. Why? Let's put it this way: She could win every single non-Republican voter in the state — Democrats, independents, libertarians, Constitution Party members and otherwise unaffiliated voters, and she could still lose by almost 50 points. That's a lot of ground to make up with Republicans.

3. Trump and MAGA candidates are going to be tested this fall.

Sure, Trump took out Meijer. But it's a district President Biden won by double-digits in 2020, and with the hard-line Gibbs, a Trump Housing and Urban Development appointee, on the ballot, it gives Democrats a key pickup opportunity.

In fact, shortly after the race was called, the Cook Political Report changed the race from Toss Up to Lean Democrat.

Sure, Masters won in the Arizona Senate race, but can someone peddling Trump's election lies and who supports Trump's hard-right policies in the ever-more-purple Arizona beat a more moderate candidate like Kelly?

Do these election deniers in secretary of state races win in states Democrats have won in the last several presidential elections when those positions have traditionally gone to fairly nonpartisan people? That's really important, because, as the Jan. 6 hearings have shown, democracy held in 2020, but only because of people who did the right thing.

4. Democrats potentially face a more powerful Trump if he becomes president.

If these candidates do win, though — and it's possible given anyone with a "D" or "R" next to their name in these highly polarized times starts at about 45% in a competitive race — and Trump runs and wins in 2024, he will be in a much stronger position to impose his will than in 2017 when he first took office or in 2021 when he left.

He would control a lot more levers in states, from state parties to elections officials. And those seeds are being sown, as Biden is at his lowest point of popularity, largely because independents concerned with inflation and high gas prices are heavily disapproving of the job he's doing, while Democrats, notably progressives, are disappointed Biden hasn't been able to get more done for them or fight as boldly as they'd like.

But come 2024, Trump could pose an emboldened threat to infighting Democrats — and if Biden runs, as he says he will, his challenge is to get his base back on board to stand up to it.

Rep. Peter Meijer, R-Mich., walks down the stairs of the U.S. Capitol. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Rep. Peter Meijer, R-Mich., walks down the stairs of the U.S. Capitol.

Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Michigan Rep. Peter Meijer, who voted to impeach former President Donald Trump after the Capitol riot, has narrowly lost his Republican primary to Trump-backed conservative challenger John Gibbs, according to a race call by The Associated Press.

The loss for Meijer is a boost for Trump as he continues endorsing primary challenges to Republican Senate and House members who disagree with his false narrative that the 2020 election was fraudulent.

Meijer, a moderate freshman Republican, was one of just 10 House GOP members who voted to impeach Trump after the Jan. 6 insurrection.

Gibbs, a former Trump appointee to the Department of Housing and Urban Development, echoes similar rhetoric as the former president about denying the results of the 2020 presidential election.

Gibbs will face off against Democratic nominee Hillary Scholten in November. Scholten, a former lawyer at the Department of Justice, lost to Meijer in 2020 by over 6 percentage points.

But following redistricting, Michigan's 3rd Congressional District looks different than it did two years ago. The Grand Rapids-based district now leans more Democratic than in previous cycles and is considered a toss-up contest by the Cook Political Report.

And in a year in which Democrats are in serious jeopardy of losing their majority in the House, the party is eyeing Michigan's 3rd as a potential get.

Tensions rose between Meijer and House Democrats last week after the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) released an ad against Gibbs, painting him as "too conservative for West Michigan."

Meijer claimed the 30-second ad would benefit Gibbs in the Republican primary.

But given the district is a toss-up seat, voters nominating a more extreme conservative in the primary could hurt Republican chances of keeping it red in November.

"You would think that the Democrats would look at John Gibbs and see the embodiment of what they say they most fear," Meijer wrote in an opinion piece published the day before his primary.

"That as patriots they would use every tool at their disposal to defeat him and similar candidates that they've said are an existential threat. Instead they are funding Gibbs," he added.

The DCCC has declined to comment on the advertisement, which reportedly cost $425,000.

"If successful, Republican voters will be blamed if any of these candidates are ultimately elected, but there is no doubt Democrats' fingerprints will be on the weapon," Meijer also wrote, "We should never forget it."

Here's where things stand for the Republicans who voted to impeach Trump

While Republicans' future hold over the district is uncertain heading into November, the future for the last few House Republicans who stood up against Trump in the aftermath of Jan. 6 remains in the balance.

Since voting to impeach Trump, more than half of the 10 GOP members have either announced that they won't seek reelection or have lost a primary reelection bid to a more conservative challenger.

Washington state Reps. Jaime Herrera Butler and Dan Newhouse also faced primary challengers Tuesday. The only member of the group of 10 to win their primary reelection bid so far has been California Rep. David Valadao.

For the final primary matchup of this group, Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney will face off against Trump-endorsed challenger Harriet Hageman on Aug. 16.

Mark Finchem, a Republican candidate for Arizona secretary of state, waves to the crowd as he arrives to speak at a rally put on by former President Donald Trump in Arizona on July 22. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

Mark Finchem, a Republican candidate for Arizona secretary of state, waves to the crowd as he arrives to speak at a rally put on by former President Donald Trump in Arizona on July 22.

Ross D. Franklin/AP

Mark Finchem, a state representative and election conspiracy theorist who was endorsed by former President Donald Trump, has won the GOP nomination to oversee voting as Arizona's secretary of state, according to a race call by The Associated Press.

Finchem will appear on the November general election ballot against either Democrat Adrian Fontes, the former county clerk of Maricopa County, Arizona's most populous county, or Democratic state Rep. Reginald Bolding. The AP has not yet called that race.

Finchem was seen as the Republican frontrunner after securing Trump's endorsement last September. He won the former president over by becoming one of the loudest proponents over the past two years of the lie that Trump won the 2020 election.

Finchem sponsored legislation this year that sought to decertify the 2020 election in three Arizona counties based on false allegations of fraud, and he was at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, although he says he did not break the law by going inside.

In an interview with NPR earlier this year, Finchem declined to call what happened there a riot or insurrection.

"What happens when the People feel they have been ignored, and Congress refuses to acknowledge rampant fraud. #stopthesteal," he tweeted that day, with a photo of people waving Trump flags on the Capitol steps.

Finchem is a longtime member of the Oath Keepers, a far-right extremist group, and he becomes the sixth election denier this primary season to move closer to overseeing voting as a statewide elections chief.

Election-denying candidates in Alabama, Indiana, Nevada and New Mexico also won GOP primaries earlier this year and in Michigan, an election denier won a party vote to become the Republican nominee there during an endorsement convention in April.

In the time since voting ended in 2020, those who believe fraud was rampant in that election have weaponized that false narrative to strip back voting access measures, as well as election security tools like the Electronic Registration Information Center or ERIC.

That's led to fear among election experts about the sort of policies these candidates would implement should they be elected.

"I never thought we would be talking about individuals governing our election system ... who felt that they should put their fingers on the scale," said Tammy Patrick, a former Arizona election official and now a senior adviser at Democracy Fund.

Finchem, for instance, says he wants to get rid of early voting and pull Arizona out of ERIC, despite bipartisan agreement that the system is among the best tools states have to detect and prevent voter fraud.

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Blake Masters won the Arizona GOP Senate primary Tuesday night, and will face Democratic Sen. Mark Kelly in November in a race that could determine control of the Senate. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

Blake Masters won the Arizona GOP Senate primary Tuesday night, and will face Democratic Sen. Mark Kelly in November in a race that could determine control of the Senate.

Ross D. Franklin/AP

Blake Masters will be the Republican candidate facing off against Arizona Democratic U.S. Sen. Mark Kelly in November in one of the most closely watched races that could determine control of the upper chamber of Congress.

Masters, a former chief operating officer of the investment firm Thiel Capital, won Tuesday's GOP primary handily, according to a race call by The Associated Press, beating out, among others, businessman Jim Lamon, state Attorney General Mark Brnovich and Michael McGuire, a retired National Guard major general.

Former President Donald Trump endorsed Masters in June. He secured the endorsement in part by contributing to the former president's conspiracy theory that the 2020 election was stolen from him. Masters said in a recent interview that had he been a senator during the last election, he would have objected to the election certification that took place on Jan. 6, 2021, the day of the Capitol insurrection.

"I think what [Sen. Josh] Hawley and, I believe, what [Sen. Ted] Cruz did was right," Masters told NBC News. "I think their constituents had a lot of concerns."

Despite his relatively healthy lead in polls, Masters was largely outspent on television ads by his opponent Lamon. But Masters' campaign has been boosted by millions of dollars from Peter Thiel, the founder of PayPal and his longtime friend and boss.

Thiel also donated significantly to the campaign of Ohio GOP Senate primary winner J.D. Vance, who also secured an endorsement from Trump.

PHOENIX — While Katie Hobbs handily won the Democratic nomination for governor in Arizona, a head-to-head race between political newcomers Kari Lake and Karrin Taylor Robson is too close to call.

The Associated Press called the Democratic primary for Hobbs almost immediately after the first round of results were announced.

Hobbs, who as secretary of state made a name for herself defending the integrity of the 2020 election in Arizona, will face one of two possible Republicans – neither of whom have positive things to say about the election two years ago.

Her opponent will be either Kari Lake, a former local newscaster who spent much of the campaign repeating former President Trump's election lies, or Karrin Taylor Robson, a wealthy land developer. Lake is supported by the former president, while Taylor Robson was endorsed by former Vice President Mike Pence.

Get more on this story from KJZZ.

Kansas state Rep. Stephanie Clayton, an abortion rights supporter who was a Republican and is now a Democrat, reacts as a referendum to strip abortion rights out of the state constitution fails. Danielle Kurtzleben/NPR hide caption

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Danielle Kurtzleben/NPR

Kansas state Rep. Stephanie Clayton, an abortion rights supporter who was a Republican and is now a Democrat, reacts as a referendum to strip abortion rights out of the state constitution fails.

Danielle Kurtzleben/NPR

LAWRENCE, Kan. — Voters in Kansas rejected a proposed state constitutional amendment Tuesday that would have said there was no right to an abortion in the state, according to The Associated Press.

Kansas was the first state to vote on abortion rights since the U.S. Supreme Court handed down its ruling in Dobbs v. Jackson's Women's Health Organization.

President Joe Biden hailed Tuesday's vote and called on Congress to pass a law to restore nationwide abortion rights that were provided by Roe.

"This vote makes clear what we know: the majority of Americans agree that women should have access to abortion and should have the right to make their own health care decisions," Biden said in a statement.

Kansas For Constitutional Freedom, the main abortion rights group opposing the amendment, called the victory "huge and decisive."

"The people of Kansas have spoken," said Rachel Sweet, campaign manager for the group. "They think that abortion should be safe, legal and accessible in the state of Kansas."

This year, a record number of abortion questions will be on state ballots, and many are asking Kansas' decision Tuesday will be an indicator of what is to come.

In the lead-up to the vote, supporters of the amendment argued that it was necessary to correct what they say was the Kansas Supreme Court's overreach in striking down some of the state's previous abortion restrictions in 2019.

Opponents argued that the amendment would set state lawmakers up to pursue a total abortion ban.

An overwhelming victory

Struggling to speak after the race was called, 23-year-old Jae Moyer said the decisive victory in the red state was surprising.

"It's never looked like this in Kansas," Moyer said. "It's so amazing. I'm so proud of my state right now."

Planned Parenthood donated millions of dollars to the opposition effort.

"Anti-abortion politicians put this amendment on the primary ballot with the goal of low voter turnout," said Emily Wales of Planned Parenthood Great Plains Votes, "but they discounted Kansans, who said loud and clear they believe and trust patients to make their own medical decisions."

Access to abortion in Kansas remains limited. The state has only four clinics where abortions remain available, all in the Wichita and Kansas City areas.

That leaves many Kansans in the western part of the state hundreds of miles away from abortion care. Many are closer to abortion providers in other states, like Colorado.

Trust Women, which operates two of the clinics in Kansas, said it will continue providing abortion care while also working to expand access throughout the state.

"We cannot be content with the status quo," the organization said. "The loss of Roe has brought with it an unprecedented and manufactured health care crisis that is not solved by this election."

Abortion opponents say they are not done

Kansans For Life, a major political group that opposes abortion rights, said in a news release that the vote is a temporary setback and the organization remains dedicated to continuing its work opposing abortion.

"While the outcome is not what we hoped, our movement and campaign have proven our resolve and commitment," the organization said. "We will not abandon women and babies."

But it's unclear what else can be done to further restrict abortion in Kansas.

Republican state Sen. Molly Baumgardner, who supported sending the amendment to voters, said abortion opponents will need to look at new restrictions to try to decrease the number of abortions in the state.

"The defeat this evening is disappointing," she said. "That struggle for truth, and the struggle for life, is going to continue in the state of Kansas."

Republicans, for the most part, remained quiet before Tuesday and wouldn't say how far they wanted to restrict abortion access if the amendment passed.

Kansas' abortion restrictions already include limiting abortions after 22 weeks of pregnancy to cases where the pregnant person's life is in danger. The state also requires an ultrasound before a procedure.

Those restrictions would have remained in place whether the amendment passed or failed. The vote in this red state may be a sign of what's to come in other abortion votes around the country later this year.

Missouri Attorney General and Republican Senate candidate Eric Schmitt speaks to supporters on July 31 in Farmington, Mo. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Missouri Attorney General and Republican Senate candidate Eric Schmitt speaks to supporters on July 31 in Farmington, Mo.

Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

ST. LOUIS — Missouri Republicans picked Attorney General Eric Schmitt to advance in the state's unpredictable U.S. Senate race, according to a call from The Associated Press, a move that seems likely to keep the seat out of reach for Democrats.

The St. Louis County native's victory comes as a relief to many Republicans throughout the state, who were worried that a win by scandal-plagued former Gov. Eric Greitens would jeopardize what many see as a surefire GOP seat.

Schmitt emerged as the winner of the 21-person primary to succeed U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt, who is not running for reelection. He defeated five other major candidates in the race, including Greitens, Congresswoman Vicky Hartzler, attorney Mark McCloskey, Congressman Billy Long and Senate President Pro Tem Dave Schatz.

Schmitt will face Anheuser-Busch heiress Trudy Busch Valentine in the November election. She beat Lucas Kunce, a Marine veteran and attorney, in the Democratic primary.

Democrats will face a tough battle to prevail in a state that's become increasingly Republican over the last few election cycles. Republicans have a stranglehold over the state's rural areas, as well as some fast-growing suburbs.

A Biden foil

Before winning a full term as attorney general in 2020, Schmitt served as Missouri treasurer and as a state senator. He was appointed to succeed U.S. Sen. Josh Hawley after he vacated the attorney general's office once he won his Senate race in 2018.

Schmitt attracted praise and criticism as attorney general for suing over President Biden's agenda — and for going after school districts that implemented COVID-19 restrictions. He faced pushback during the primary from his adversaries who pointed out aspects of his state Senate record, including pushing for a cargo hub in St. Louis that would trade with China.

Schmitt largely ignored those attacks, and instead emphasized his record as attorney general as he campaigned throughout the state. He got a boost before the primary from Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, who headlined several well-attended rallies with Schmitt.

Former President Donald Trump on Monday took the unusual step of just endorsing "ERIC" in the Senate race, which for all intents and purposes meant he was backing Schmitt and Greitens.

Efforts to stop Greitens succeed

Former Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens speaks with reporters after voting Tuesday in Innsbrook, Mo. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Former Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens speaks with reporters after voting Tuesday in Innsbrook, Mo.

Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Schmitt's victory will likely provide relief for Republicans who were fearful of a Greitens victory.

Greitens was at the top of most polls for the majority of the contest. But his standing began to collapse as he faced an avalanche of political action committee advertisements detailing abuse allegations from his ex-wife. Greitens denied that he ever physically abused his ex-wife, Sheena Grietens, or their son, but most observers felt the deluge of negativity eroded his support.

"I don't think I've seen more destructive ads put out against a candidate," said state Sen. Bill Eigel, who opposed Greitens' candidacy. "And in this case, I'm one of the folks, and there's many folks, who believe what she's saying."

Republicans feared Greitens would make a general election more competitive. In addition to the recent scandal, Greitens resigned in 2018 amid controversies around an extramarital affair and campaign finance woes. Greitens' supporters contended that he was never in danger of losing a general election since the state is so Republican now, adding that his detractors didn't want him to have a national platform.

With Greitens slipping in the polls, Schmitt spent most of his time attacking Hartzler — who had the backing of Hawley and a slew of agricultural groups. But even though she ran a disciplined and well-funded campaign, she was badly damaged when Trump refused to endorse her.

Hartzler continued to barnstorm the state, including making several stops with Hawley, but it wasn't enough to stop Schmitt from winning.

In addition to Schmitt's Democratic opponent, John Wood, a former U.S. attorney, is slated to run as an independent — and could have access to millions of dollars thanks to his connection to former U.S. Sen. John Danforth. While independent candidates have rarely made an impact in Missouri statewide contests, Wood is hoping to buck that trend.

August 2

Tudor Dixon will face Gov. Gretchen Whitmer in Michigan race for governor

Michigan Republican candidate for governor Tudor Dixon appears at a debate in Grand Rapids, Mich., Wednesday, July 6, 2022. Michael Buck/AP hide caption

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Michael Buck/AP

Michigan Republican candidate for governor Tudor Dixon appears at a debate in Grand Rapids, Mich., Wednesday, July 6, 2022.

Michael Buck/AP

LANSING, Mich. — Tudor Dixon has won the Michigan Republican primary for governor, according to The Associated Press.

Friday, Dixon received a late endorsement from former President Donald Trump. Previously, she also racked up endorsements from well-known names in Michigan politics, like the family of former U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Dixon is fervently against abortion rights and made recent headlines after responding to a question about the hypothetical rape of a 14-year-old by a family member being a "perfect example" of why abortion should be banned.

Before that, Dixon had made schools and education central issues for her campaign. She has also heavily criticized incumbent Gov. Gretchen Whitmer's early COVID-19-pandemic lockdown policies.

Lately, Dixon has seen attacks directed at her from both sides of the aisle. Her Republican challengers had pushed back on her support from the DeVos family and other political insiders. Meanwhile, the Democratic Governors Association has also run attack ads against Dixon, with a recent $2 million campaign against her.

Dixon is a businesswoman and a former conservative media host and will go on to face incumbent Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, a well-funded Democrat.

According to two race calls by The Associated Press, Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly, a Democrat, and Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt, a Republican, have won their primaries for governor in the state.

They will face one another in November in a race that is considered a "tossup" by the non-partisan Cook Political Report.

Kelly lost favorability in her state during the pandemic. Schmidt, who is backed by former President Donald Trump, is known for promoting Trump's false claims about the 2020 election. Kelly is an abortion rights supporter. Schmidt is an abortion rights opponent.

Get more race results from Kansas.

After multiple nights of abortion-rights protests, security fences and barbed wire surround the Arizona Capitol, Monday, June 27, 2022, in Phoenix. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

After multiple nights of abortion-rights protests, security fences and barbed wire surround the Arizona Capitol, Monday, June 27, 2022, in Phoenix.

Ross D. Franklin/AP

PHOENIX — There is a lot of confusion around what is legal in Arizona when it comes to abortion after Roe v. Wade.

Arizona has an abortion law dating back to the 1800s, decades before it became a state. A debate around that law has moved the race for state attorney general into the spotlight.

That law outlaws abortions with very few exceptions, and it has never been repealed. But the state also has a number of more recent laws that restrict abortion in various other ways. For example, the state's legislature this year passed a law banning abortion after 15 weeks of gestation. So the question is, which laws are providers supposed to follow?

Arizona's current state attorney general, Republican Mark Brnovich, says the old ban from territorial days is enforceable. But Brnovich is at the end of his term, so both sides of the issue now are really focused on who will replace him and what the next AG's interpretation of Arizona's law will be.

On the Republican side, there are six candidates and they've all indicated that they would plan to enforce state laws that restrict abortion.

On the Democrat side, there's only one candidate running unopposed who says any limits on abortion in Arizona are in violation of the state constitution, which guarantees an individual's right to privacy.

For now, most abortions have already stopped in Arizona. Brnovich is seeking to enforce the state's 19th-century ban. While the issue is stalled in court, Planned Parenthood and other providers don't want to take a risk while the law is still unclear. Already there are reports of California clinics getting a big influx of Arizona patients.

A voter places a ballot in a drop box outside of the Maricopa County Elections Department on August 02, 2022 in Phoenix, Arizona. Arizonans are voting in the state's midterm primary election. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A voter places a ballot in a drop box outside of the Maricopa County Elections Department on August 02, 2022 in Phoenix, Arizona. Arizonans are voting in the state's midterm primary election.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

PHOENIX — Arizona's primary election is defined by open races for several statewide positions, and the election-denying candidates running to assume those roles in 2023.

There are no incumbents running for three key statewide offices – governor, attorney general and secretary of state – the top election gig in Arizona. Former President Donald Trump has exerted his influence over crowded fields of candidates, many of whom continue to baselessly assert the 2020 election, which Trump lost in Arizona and nationwide, was stolen.

That includes Trump-endorsed candidates like former local news anchor Kari Lake, who's running for governor; state Rep. Mark Finchem, who's running for secretary of state; and Abe Hamadeh, who's running for attorney general.

In fact, Lake has already taken a page out of the Trump playbook and claimed the current election is rigged against her. She's repeatedly refused to present evidence to back her claims when confronted by reporters.

Lake's closest competition is a wealthy developer, Karrin Taylor Robson, who's backed by the conservative establishment both in Arizona and nationally. Current Gov. Doug Ducey has endorsed her, as has former Vice President Mike Pence.

Taylor Robson has spent millions of dollars to brand herself as a more reasonable-sounding Republican, though her policies don't often differ from Lake. Both have similar talking points when it comes to border security and so-called critical race theory. And Taylor Robson has done little to dispel concerns about the 2020 election while she criticizes Lake for casting doubt on the current vote.

Elsewhere, a crowded field of Republicans, led by Trump endorsee and former venture capitalist Blake Masters, are vying for the right to run against Democratic Sen. Mark Kelly in November. Kelly's win in 2020 gave Democrats control of both Arizona's U.S. Senate seats, and national Republican leaders have viewed the state as a potential rebound ever since.

Races further down the ballot will also set the stage for competitive congressional seats up for grabs in November. Redistricting made two key districts currently occupied by Democrats more conservative, giving Republicans a chance to pick up key U.S. House seats in a state Democrats now control 5-4.

Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly speaks during a news conference, Thursday, Jan. 6, 2022, at the Statehouse in Topeka, Kan. John Hanna/AP hide caption

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John Hanna/AP

Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly speaks during a news conference, Thursday, Jan. 6, 2022, at the Statehouse in Topeka, Kan.

John Hanna/AP

Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly, the incumbent Democrat who won in 2018 with 48% of the vote, is expected to win her primary on Tuesday against Democrat Richard Karnowski, but the November election could be a different story.

The race for governor is considered a tossup, according to the non-partisan Cook Political Report. Kelly lost favorability among Republicans during the pandemic for enforcing COVID-19 health restrictions. Her expected rival is Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt. His primary rival Tuesday is Arlyn Briggs.

Schmidt has served as the attorney general in Kansas since 2010 and is endorsed by former President Donald Trump. Schmidt promoted Trump's false claims about the 2020 election, including joining a lawsuit that challenged the legitimacy of President Biden's win. The U.S. Supreme Court dismissed that lawsuit in Dec. 2020.

When it comes to abortion, Schmidt has been criticized for a legal opinion he released on the constitutional amendment before voters Tuesday. Schmidt backs the amendment, which would explicitly say the state constitution does not protect the right to an abortion. Critics say his opinion, which contended the change to the Kansas Constitution would not restrict treatments for medically dangerous pregnancies, was a ploy intended to bolster the chances of passing a change to the state constitution.

Kelly, on the other hand, is adamantly pro-abortion rights.

"My position on reproductive rights has been clear from the get-go, from the moment I walked onto the Senate floor," Kelly has said. "I really do believe this is a decision that should be left to a woman and her physician, and not involve politicians."

Republican state Sen. Dennis Pyle submitted signatures this week that, if certified, would put him on the November ballot as an independent candidate for governor. He's a conservative Republican and could, conceivably, siphon off some votes from Schmidt.

KMUW's Rose Conlon and Scott Canon of the Kansas News Service contributed to this post.

Political signs for the state constitutional amendment vote on abortion rights in Kansas sit near each other in yards in Overland Park, Kan., July 16, 2022. Dylan Lysen/Kansas News Service hide caption

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Dylan Lysen/Kansas News Service

Political signs for the state constitutional amendment vote on abortion rights in Kansas sit near each other in yards in Overland Park, Kan., July 16, 2022.

Dylan Lysen/Kansas News Service

LAWRENCE, Kan. — Today, voters in Kansas will decide whether their state constitution should not explicitly protect abortion. Protesters against the amendment have taken to the streets, while rallies in support are taking place in church sanctuaries. It's also spurred millions of dollars of campaign funding to flood into the state from across the country.

See more live Kansas election results here.

Supporters say the amendment does not ban abortion. They argue it would correct what they see as the state court's overreach by striking down some of the state's previous abortion restrictions. For example, a law struck down in December that mandated specific health inspections for abortion providers could kick in if voters tweak the state constitution next week.

As the state hurtles toward the vote, the campaign arguments have been contentious, and the vote appears to be close.

"At the end of the day, the vast majority of Kansans, they are with us," said Mercedes Schlapp during a recent rally at Central Christian Church in Wichita. Schlapp's husband, Matt Schlapp is the chairman of the American Conservative union. They argued the vote simply puts abortion policymaking back in the hands of lawmakers.

"They understand the importance of this amendment to protect the woman and protect our unborn babies."

But at least some polling doesn't support that. According to a 2021 Kansas Speaks survey by Fort Hays State University, most Kansans support at least some access to abortion services.

Alesha Doan, an abortion policy expert at the University of Kansas, says work by abortion opponents over the last 30 years has had one goal in mind — a full-blown abortion ban in Kansas.

Protests have popped up even in some of the most conservative communities in the western part of the state — Hays, Dodge City and Garden City.

Abortion is a major issue in today's primary elections. Kansas voters will decide whether to approve a constitutional amendment that would explicitly state there is no right to an abortion in the state. And in Michigan, a court ruling on Monday added more legal questions about the availability of abortion in the state.

Nationwide, abortion is now illegal or heavily restricted in at least 12 states following the Supreme Court's historic decision in June to overturn Roe v. Wade. At least ten other states have laws in place that pave the way to quickly ban or severely restrict access to abortion.

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Get more detailed information about the state of abortion restrictions across the country in our abortion law tracker.

In a photo from Jan. 17, 2020, the Michigan Hall of Justice is seen in Lansing, Mich. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

In a photo from Jan. 17, 2020, the Michigan Hall of Justice is seen in Lansing, Mich.

Carlos Osorio/AP

Up until Monday in Michigan, the line on abortion rights was clear. The state has a 1931 law that criminalizes abortion that was dormant during Roe v. Wade. In May, a month before the Dobbs decision, a lower court in the state put an injunction on the 1931 law, so it wasn't in effect when the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.

Monday, the Michigan Court of Appeals issued a ruling saying that injunction does not apply to county prosecutors – so they could enforce the 1931 abortion ban. But because the decision appears to not take effect for 21 days, it allows time for appeals to be filed.

People in the state can still access abortion in the state, but it's a confusing time and some abortion providers aren't completely sure about where things stand legally.

Tuesday's primary for governor

The backdrop to that Tuesday's primary for governor in Michigan where Republican candidates are fighting one another for the chance to face Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer in November.

All five candidates are against abortion rights and all five support the state's 1931 law that criminalizes abortion. That includes Tudor Dixon. She was endorsed by former President Donald Trump Friday night. She was also endorsed by Right to Life of Michigan – a really big get in Michigan Republican politics.

A state constitutional amendment

There is also a ballot campaign in Michigan to get abortion rights enshrined into the state constitution. The group backing the amendment, Reproductive Freedom for All, last month turned in a record number of signatures – more than 750,000.

If that question makes it onto the November ballot, voters will of course be voting for Governor, but they would also then be voting on the future of abortion rights in Michigan. That could really impact voter turnout in the state.

Protesters who oppose a state constitutional amendment that would remove the right to abortion in Kansas march around the Kansas Statehouse in Topeka. Dylan Lysen/Kansas News Service hide caption

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Dylan Lysen/Kansas News Service

Protesters who oppose a state constitutional amendment that would remove the right to abortion in Kansas march around the Kansas Statehouse in Topeka.

Dylan Lysen/Kansas News Service

TOPEKA, Kansas — Kansans have been arguing with each other about abortion for at least a generation.

But the stakes have never been this high. Kansas will be the first state in the country to vote on abortion rights since the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.

The U.S. Supreme Court says states are free to outlaw abortion. The Kansas Supreme Court says, sure, but only if you first change the state constitution.

And the legislature, dominated by conservatives against abortion rights, put an amendment to the Kansas Constitution up for a statewide vote Tuesday.

That's drawn millions in campaign spending to the state and fired up forces on both sides.

"You should have the freedom to decide whatever you want for yourself," says Shauna Williams, a Topeka resident who recently protested outside the Kansas Statehouse to oppose the constitutional amendment.

She and other protesters say that if voters choose the constitutional amendment, state lawmakers could dictate what a person does with their body while pregnant. Supporters of the change see it as a way to regulate abortion in line with how Kansans feel about abortion.

Many states saw abortion restrictions go into effect immediately after the ruling. But the right to an abortion continued in Kansas because of a landmark 2019 Kansas Supreme Court decision.

So the stakes were raised for the vote in Kansas, turning a philosophical question to change the state constitution into a decision that will have real-world consequences.

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