Legacy : A Blog Supreme The music is only about 100 years old, but it's already seen scores of geniuses creating joyful noises against all odds. We examine time-honored masterpieces and tell the narratives around them — and in doing so, refract the cultural history of the United States and beyond.

Legacy

The bebop innovator Dizzy Gillespie on 52nd Street in New York, which was filled with small jazz clubs in the 1940s. William Gottlieb/The Library of Congress hide caption

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William Gottlieb/The Library of Congress

Donald Byrd onstage, in an image circulated by his record label at the time, Blue Note Records. Echoes/Redferns/Getty Images hide caption

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Echoes/Redferns/Getty Images

Remembering Donald Byrd, Jazz Trumpeter Who Spanned Generations

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Marcus Gilmore (left) and Roy Haynes perform together in Washington, D.C., in 2009. Haynes' daughter is Gilmore's mother. Theo Wargo/Getty Images hide caption

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Theo Wargo/Getty Images

The 2013 NEA Jazz Masters. From left: Eddie Palmieri, Mose Allison, Lou Donaldson. Not pictured: Lorraine Gordon. Michael G. Stewart/NEA hide caption

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Michael G. Stewart/NEA

Listen Now: The 2013 NEA Jazz Masters Concert

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Herbie Hancock speaks with the current class of Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz Performance masters degree students. Chip Latshaw/UCLA hide caption

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Chip Latshaw/UCLA

Teddy Wilson (center) and drummer Zutty Singleton in 1940. William Gottlieb/The Library Of Congress hide caption

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William Gottlieb/The Library Of Congress

Drummer Pete La Roca plays during the May 19, 1965 recording session for his album Basra. Francis Wolff/Mosaic Images/Corbis hide caption

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Francis Wolff/Mosaic Images/Corbis

Bassist Percy Heath demonstrates a technique to a student at the summer jazz workshop in Lenox, Mass. in 1959. Alfred Eisenstaedt/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Alfred Eisenstaedt/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

Michel Petrucciani on the concert stage in February 1993. Frederic Reglain/Gamma-Rapho/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic Reglain/Gamma-Rapho/Getty Images

Bassist Charles Mingus leads a band at the 1964 Monterey Jazz Festival, including Lonnie Hillyer (trumpet) and Charles McPherson (alto sax, obscured). Ray Avery/CTSIMAGES hide caption

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Ray Avery/CTSIMAGES

Branford Marsalis spoke with NPR about modern jazz, his family, and his new album, Four MFs Playin' Tunes. Courtesy of Marsalis Music. hide caption

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Courtesy of Marsalis Music.

Branford Marsalis On Sensitive Musicians And The First Family Of Jazz

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