Legacy : A Blog Supreme The music is only about 100 years old, but it's already seen scores of geniuses creating joyful noises against all odds. We examine time-honored masterpieces and tell the narratives around them — and in doing so, refract the cultural history of the United States and beyond.

Legacy

Horace Silver performs for television in Copenhagen, Denmark, in 1979. JazzSign/Lebrecht Music & Arts/Corbis hide caption

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JazzSign/Lebrecht Music & Arts/Corbis

Legendary Pianist Horace Silver Dies At 85

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Evidently, pianist Kris Bowers' bookshelf includes James Baldwin's uncollected writings and Robin Kelley's biography of Thelonious Monk. Janette Beckman/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Janette Beckman/Courtesy of the artist

John Coltrane during the recording of A Love Supreme in December 1964. Chuck Stewart/Courtesy of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History hide caption

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Chuck Stewart/Courtesy of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History

Clockwise from top left: Anthony Braxton, Keith Jarrett, Richard Davis, Jamey Aebersold. Carolyn Wachnicki/Rose Anne Colavito/Ken Halfmann/John Nation/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Carolyn Wachnicki/Rose Anne Colavito/Ken Halfmann/John Nation/Courtesy of the artist

Kenny Clarke performs at the Montreux Jazz Festival in 1968. He spent the second half of his career in Europe. JazzSign/Lebrecht Music & Arts/Corbis hide caption

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JazzSign/Lebrecht Music & Arts/Corbis

The late documentary filmmaker Jean Bach stands next to an enlarged 1958 photograph of many jazz musicians titled "A Great Day in Harlem." Her documentary about the photo shoot was nominated for an Academy Award in 1995. Thomas Monaster/New York Daily News Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Monaster/New York Daily News Archive/Getty Images

Chico Hamilton. Todd Boebel/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Todd Boebel/Courtesy of the artist

Drummer Chico Hamilton, West Coast Jazz Pioneer, Dies

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Sathima Bea Benjamin in 1974. Ian Bruce Huntley/Courtesy of Matsuli Music hide caption

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Ian Bruce Huntley/Courtesy of Matsuli Music