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Paul Rusesabagina looks on as he sits with some of his co-accused at the Supreme Court in Kigali, Rwanda, on Feb. 17, 2021, where he denied charges of being associated with an armed group. On Friday, the Rwandan government said it commuted his sentence. Simon Wohlfahrt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Simon Wohlfahrt/AFP via Getty Images

Paul Rusesabagina, 'Hotel Rwanda' hero, released from prison

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Kenyan gays and lesbians and others supporting their cause wear masks to preserve their anonymity as they stage a rare protest against Uganda's tough stance against homosexuality and in solidarity with their counterparts there, outside the Uganda High Commission in Nairobi, Kenya, in 2014. Ben Curtis/AP hide caption

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Ben Curtis/AP

Uganda to jail people who identify as LGBTQ in one of world's most anti-gay laws

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Malawi (pictured above) and Mozambique were devastated by the Cyclone Freddy, which lasted at least 36 days and made landfall twice in Mozambique. Thoko Chikondi/AP hide caption

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Thoko Chikondi/AP

Women walk to a nearby displacement center in Blantyre, Malawi, on Tuesday. The unrelenting Cyclone Freddy, which is still battering southern Africa, has killed hundreds of people in Malawi and Mozambique since it struck the continent for a second time on Saturday night. Thoko Chikondi/AP hide caption

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Thoko Chikondi/AP

Migrants camp outside the headquarters of the International Organisation for Migration (IOM) in Tunis, on March 7, 2023. After President Kais Saied ordered "urgent measures" against irregular sub-Saharan migrants, hundreds of West Africans, evicted in recent days by landlords fearing heavy fines for hosting undocumented migrants, have flocked to their embassies in Tunis to seek repatriation. Fethi Belad/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fethi Belad/AFP via Getty Images

International institutions are protesting Tunisia's racist crackdown on migrants

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Munyaradzi Musvosvi, a researcher who works for the South African Tuberculosis Vaccine Initiative, in a storage facility at the University of Cape Town that holds in deep freeze the blood samples of people exposed to TB. He's part of a team working to develop a potential mRNA vaccine by looking at the immune cells in the blood samples. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Frozen cells reveal a clue for a vaccine to block the deadly TB bug

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Bola Tinubu gestures toward the crowd during a campaign rally in Lagos. He has been declared the winner of Nigeria's presidential elections. Michele Spatari/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Michele Spatari/AFP via Getty Images

Nigeria, Africa's most populous nation, elects Bola Tinubu as the new president

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Demonstrators accusing the election commission of irregularities and disenfranchising voters make a protest in downtown Abuja, Nigeria. Ben Curtis/AP hide caption

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Ben Curtis/AP

Nigeria's opposition parties call elections a 'sham' and demand a new vote

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Babacar Niang, known as Matador, raps at a recording studio at Africulturban's center in Pikine, Senegal. Ricci Shryock for NPR hide caption

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Ricci Shryock for NPR

Senegal's artists are fighting the system with a mic and spray paint

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People cheer as ballot papers are counted at a polling station in Abuja at the end of election day in Nigeria MICHELE SPATARI/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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MICHELE SPATARI/AFP via Getty Images

Nigerian election: votes are counted after bitterly fought election

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Supporters of Nigeria's Labour Party attend a rally at Adamasingba Stadium in Ibadan, southwestern Nigeria, on Nov. 23, 2022. Nigerians go to the polls on Saturday to choose their next president. Pius Utomi Ekpei/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Pius Utomi Ekpei/AFP via Getty Images

What's at stake as Nigerians elect the president of Africa's largest democracy

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Nigerians are furious as the country switches currencies, creating a cash shortage

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Moustapha Dieye on his boat in Guet Ndar, Senegal on October 5. Dieye took a pirogue to Spain in 2006, where he now legally resides. His family has a boat in Saint Louis, where he is originally from. Ricci Shryock for NPR hide caption

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Ricci Shryock for NPR

Guet N'dar, Senegal (October 7, 2022) - The neighborhood Khar Yalla, which means 'Waiting for God," in Wolof, was meant as a place for those who had been displaced by rising seas to live. But this neighborhood soon, too, was inundated with water. Ricci Shryock for NPR hide caption

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Ricci Shryock for NPR

Pope Francis arrives to celebrate mass at the John Garang Mausoleum in Juba, South Sudan, Sunday, Feb. 5, 2023. Francis is in South Sudan on the second leg of a six-day trip that started in Congo, hoping to bring comfort and encouragement to two countries that have been riven by poverty, conflicts and what he calls a "colonialist mentality" that has exploited Africa for centuries. Gregorio Borgia/AP hide caption

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Gregorio Borgia/AP