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Megan Baker (left) of Papa & Barkley Co., a Cannabis company based in Eureka, Calif., shows Shirley Avedon of Laguna Woods different products intended to help with pain relief. Stephanie O'Neill for NPR hide caption

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Stephanie O'Neill for NPR

Ticket To Ride: Pot Sellers Put Seniors On The Canna-Bus

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Baby boomers who use marijuana seem to be using it more often than in previous years, a recent survey finds — 5.7 percent of respondents ages 50 to 64 said they'd tried it in the past month. The drug is also gaining popularity among people in their 70s and 80s. Manonallard/Getty Images hide caption

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Manonallard/Getty Images

Jason B. Rosenthal on the TED Stage. Jason Redmond/Jason Redmond / TED hide caption

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Jason Redmond/Jason Redmond / TED

Jason Rosenthal: What Does the Loss Of A Loved One Teach Us About Life?

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Michelle Knox on the TED stage. Jean-Jacques Halans/Jean-Jacques Halans/TED hide caption

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Jean-Jacques Halans/Jean-Jacques Halans/TED

Michelle Knox: Can Talking About Death Take Fear And Stress Out Of The Inevitable?

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Lux Narayan on the TED stage. Ryan Lash/TED/TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/TED/TED

Lux Narayan: What Do Obituaries Teach Us About Lives Well-Lived?

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Emily Levine on the TED Stage. Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash / TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash / TED

Emily Levine: How Do We Make Peace With Death When It's Imminent?

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Caitlin Doughty on the TED stage. Photo Courtesy/TEDMED hide caption

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Photo Courtesy/TEDMED

Caitlin Doughty: What's Wrong With The Way We Bury The Dead?

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Jimmy Lockett thought he was born in Louisiana but discovered he was born in Memphis when he applied for his state photo ID. Johnathon Kelso hide caption

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Johnathon Kelso

For Older Voters, Getting The Right ID Can Be Especially Tough

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Courtesy of G. P. Putnam's Sons

'Gross Anatomy' Turns Humor On Taboos About The Female Body

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An image of a rosehip neuron (top) and a connecting pyramidal cell (bottom). Tamas Lab/University of Szeged hide caption

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Tamas Lab/University of Szeged

What Makes A Human Brain Unique? A Newly Discovered Neuron May Be A Clue

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Mario Ramos (left) and wife Tally adjust their umbrellas in Laguna Beach, Calif. The state was among a number of places this summer that experienced their highest temperatures on record. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Cashiers, cooks, delivery people, fast-food workers and their supporters rallied outside New York City Hall in 2017. Their influential union, the Service Employees International Union, also includes about half a million home health aides. Pacific Press/LightRocket/Getty Images hide caption

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Pacific Press/LightRocket/Getty Images

The results of genetic testing — whether done for health reasons or ancestry searches — can be used by insurance underwriters in evaluating an application for life insurance, or a disability or long-term-care policy. Science Photo Library RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library RF/Getty Images

In the mountain town of Juyaya, Puerto Rico, last October, children watched as U.S. Army helicopters brought a team of physicians to assess the medical needs of the local hospital and residents. Going forward, health economists say, the U.S. territory will need continued federal help to deal with its overwhelming Medicaid expenses. Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Good hospice care at the end of life can be a godsend to patients and their families, all agree, whether the care comes at home, or at an inpatient facility like this AIDS hospice. Still, oversight of the industry is important, federal investigators say. Bromberger Hoover Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Bromberger Hoover Photography/Getty Images

HHS Inspector General's Report Finds Flaws And Fraud In U.S. Hospice Care

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Unless you replenish fluids, just an hour's hike in the heat or a 30-minute run might be enough to get mildly dehydrated, scientists say. RunPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Off Your Mental Game? You Could Be Mildly Dehydrated

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Medicare's proposed changes to doctors' compensation will reduce paperwork, physicians agree. But at what cost to their income? andresr/Getty Images hide caption

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andresr/Getty Images

Some Doctors, Patients Balk At Medicare's 'Flat Fee' Payment Proposal

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Having more than one child is associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer's, research finds, as is starting menstruation earlier in life than average and menopause later. Ronnie Kaufman/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Ronnie Kaufman/Blend Images/Getty Images

Hormone Levels Likely Influence A Woman's Risk Of Alzheimer's, But How?

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Jose and Elaine Belardo's lives were upended last year when he was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

How Soon Is Soon Enough To Learn You Have Alzheimer's?

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When the heart pushes too hard, as it does when blood pressure is elevated, it can cause damage that can lead to a stroke, says Dr. Walter Koroshetz. John Rensten/Getty Images hide caption

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John Rensten/Getty Images

Worried About Dementia? You Might Want to Check Your Blood Pressure

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