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Everyday tasks — such as buttoning a shirt, opening a jar or brushing teeth — can suddenly seem impossible after a stroke that affects the brain's fine motor control of the hands. New research suggests starting intensive rehab a bit later than typically happens now — and continuing it longer — might improve recovery. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

The Best Time For Rehabilitation After A Stroke Might Actually Be 2 To 3 Months Later

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Charlie Callagan's bone marrow transplant for multiple myeloma was recently postponed at the last minute because Oregon hospitals are overwhelmed with treating COVID-19 patients. Erik Neumann / Jefferson Public Radio hide caption

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Erik Neumann / Jefferson Public Radio

Overwhelmed With COVID Patients, Oregon Hospitals Postpone Surgeries And Cancer Care

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An axolotl photographed in Lake Xochimilco. Paul Starosta/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Starosta/Getty Images

A Lotl Love For The Axolotl

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Dr. Simone Gold discourages vaccination against COVID-19 and promotes alternative, unproven therapies. She has spent much of the past year speaking at events like this one held in West Palm Beach, Fla., in December. The conference was aimed at young people ages 15 to 25. Gage Skidmore hide caption

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Gage Skidmore

This Doctor Spread False Information About COVID. She Still Kept Her Medical License

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ECMO is the highest level of life support — beyond a ventilator, which pumps oxygen via a tube through the windpipe into the lungs. Instead, the ECMO process basically functions as a heart and lungs outside of the body — routing the blood via tubing to a machine that oxygenates it, then pumps it back into the patient. Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio hide caption

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Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio

Across The COVID-Ravaged South, High-Level Life Support Is Difficult To Find

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Health care providers who administer a COVID-19 vaccine "off-label" face legal liability, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns. Luis Alvarez/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Alvarez/Getty Images

Federal health officials are planning ahead to give booster shots in the fall to all U.S. adults, starting with those who were vaccinated early on, like the elderly, health care workers and first responders. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Demonstrators calling on people to wear masks gather outside school district headquarters in Marietta, Ga., last week. A recent review at pandemic data finds requiring masks, capping the size of gatherings and instituting certain bar, gym and restaurant restrictions are all strategies that can help stop a surge in COVID-19 hospitalizations. Mike Stewart/AP hide caption

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Mike Stewart/AP

Even Moderate COVID Restrictions Can Slow The Spread Of The Virus — If They're Timely

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Tourists still stop by to see the confluence of the Mississippi and Ohio rivers in Cairo, Ill., where commercial ships dock on the banks. A history of racial tension dating to the Civil War still stings in Cairo. And like many rural towns across the U.S., the community feels underappreciated and misunderstood. Cara Anthony/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Cara Anthony/Kaiser Health News

Medicare is funded by a combination of money paid directly to the federal government from paychecks and taxes paid by working Americans. Most dental procedures and tests are not covered under traditional Medicare. Cavan Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Cavan Images/Getty Images

In the 1970s, Vernice Davis Anthony was one of dozens of Detroit public health nurses who regularly fanned out throughout the city, building trust. They visited the home of every new mom and worked in schools, tracking cases of infectious diseases and making sure kids got immunized. Nic Antaya/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Nic Antaya/Kaiser Health News

As part of a clinical study, a patient with Alzheimer's disease receives an infusion of aducanumab at a Providence, R.I., hospital in 2019. Aducanumab is being marketed as Aduhelm. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

A New Alzheimer's Drug Comes With Lots Of Questions About How To Use It

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Medical staff members check on a patient in the COVID-19 Intensive Care Unit at United Memorial Medical Center in Houston last November. Doctors are now investigating whether people with lingering cognitive symptoms may be at risk for dementia. Go Nakamura/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Go Nakamura/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Doctors Worry That Memory Problems After COVID-19 May Set The Stage For Alzheimer's

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When working out in the summer, watch for the signs of dehydration and heat stroke. Choosing a later evening or early morning time for a run in one smart way to stay safe. RyanJLane/Getty Images hide caption

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RyanJLane/Getty Images

U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy, who has helped the U.S. through other crises like the Zika outbreak, is now taking on health misinformation around COVID-19, which he says continues to jeopardize the country's efforts to beat back the virus. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

The U.S. Surgeon General Is Calling COVID-19 Misinformation An 'Urgent Threat'

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A Teton County emergency medical services volunteer outside the Benefis Teton Medical Center in Choteau, Mont. Aaron Bolton/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Aaron Bolton/Montana Public Radio

Rural Ambulance Services At Risk As Volunteers Age And Expenses Mount

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Kathleen McAuliffe, a home care worker for Catholic Charities in a Portland, Maine, suburb, helps client John Gardner with his weekly chores. McAuliffe shops for Gardner's groceries, cleans his home and runs errands for him during her weekly visit. Brianna Soukup/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Brianna Soukup/Kaiser Health News

A doctor reviews a PET brain scan at Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix. The drug company Biogen Inc. says it will seek federal approval for a medicine to treat early Alzheimer's disease. The announcement was a surprise because the company stopped two studies of aducanumab in 2019 after partial results suggested it was not working. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

FDA Approves Aducanumab — A Controversial Drug For Alzheimer's

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Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, warned on Tuesday of the danger from the Delta variant of the coronavirus. Among those not yet vaccinated, Delta may trigger serious illness in more people than other variants do. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Fauci Warns Dangerous Delta Variant Is The Greatest Threat To U.S. COVID Efforts

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The COVID-19 pandemic has been particularly difficult for unpaid caregivers, with many reporting symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression. Portra Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Portra Images via Getty Images

Unpaid Caregivers Were Already Struggling. It's Only Gotten Worse During The Pandemic

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Joy Ho for NPR

5 Ways To Stop Summer Colds From Making The Rounds In Your Family

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Portrait of Phillip Lyn taken by his spouse, Kurt Rehwinkel, outside their home in St. Louis. Kurt Rehwinkel hide caption

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Kurt Rehwinkel

For Those Facing Alzheimer's, A Controversial Drug Offers Hope

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