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Low-dose estrogen can be taken orally, but it's also now available in patches, gels and creams. svetikd/Getty Images hide caption

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Hormones for menopause are safe, study finds. Here's what changed

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Climbing stairs is a good way to get quick bursts of aerobic exercise, says cardiologist Dr. Carlin Long. lingqi xie/Getty Images hide caption

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Elevator or stairs? Your choice could boost longevity, study finds

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The Biden administration is establishing new standards for how much time each day a nursing home resident gets direct care from a nurse or an aide. picture alliance/Getty Images hide caption

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No matter how old you are, having a happy birthday is one of life's great pleasures, says Tamar Hurwitz-Fleming, author of How to Have a Happy Birthday. Click here to download this cake-shaped zine to print and fold at home — the back has helpful birthday tips. Zine by Malaka Gharib/NPR; Photo illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Zine by Malaka Gharib/NPR; Photo illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

This cake-shaped zine may help you have your happiest birthday yet

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A cheap drug may slow down aging. A study will determine if it works

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After using the Lenire device for an hour each day for 12 weeks, Victoria Banks says her tinnitus is "barely noticeable." David Petrelli/Victoria Banks hide caption

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David Petrelli/Victoria Banks

Got tinnitus? A device that tickles the tongue helps this musician find relief

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One of the cells in the Transitional Care Unit at the Minnesota Correctional Facility at Oak Park Heights. Caroline Yang for NPR hide caption

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Caroline Yang for NPR

The U.S. prison population is rapidly graying. Prisons aren't built for what's coming

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Strength training is good for everyone, but women who train regularly get a significantly higher boost in longevity than men. Gary Yeowell/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Yeowell/Getty Images

Women who do strength training live longer. How much is enough?

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Dr. Louise Aronson, a geriatrician and author, speaks with a patient at UCSF's Osher Center for Integrative Health in San Francisco. Julia Burns hide caption

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Julia Burns

Ageism in health care is more common than you might think, and it can harm people

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A plant-based diet is not just good for your health, it's good for the planet. Alexander Spatari/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Spatari/Getty Images

This diet swap can cut your carbon footprint and boost longevity

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Hurricane Irene caused enormous damage in New York state, flooding homes like this one in Prattsville, NY, in 2011. Major weather events like Irene send people to the hospital and can even contribute to deaths for weeks after the storms. Monika Graff/Getty Images hide caption

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Monika Graff/Getty Images

Cognitive neuroscientist Charan Ranganath says the human brain isn't programmed to remember everything. Rather, it's designed to "carry what we need and to deploy it rapidly when we need it." Bulat Silvia/iStock / Getty Images Plus hide caption

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Bulat Silvia/iStock / Getty Images Plus

When is forgetting normal — and when is it worrisome? A neuroscientist weighs in

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Prisoner and patient Alton Batiste, 72, in Angola's nursing unit in 2017. The prison had to change some of its rules when it introduced hospice, allowing inmates to touch each other, for instance. Annie Flanagan/Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Annie Flanagan/Washington Post via Getty Images

This tuna, chickpea and parmesan salad bowl packs a protein punch, which is crucial for building muscle strength. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR

Millions of women are 'under-muscled.' These foods help build strength

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President Biden delivers remarks Thursday at the White House. Biden addressed the special counsel's report on his handling of classified material, and the status of the war in Gaza. Nathan Howard/Getty Images hide caption

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Tai chi has many health benefits. It improves flexibility, reduces stress and can help lower blood pressure. Ruth Jenkinson/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Ruth Jenkinson/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

Tai chi reduces blood pressure better than aerobic exercise, study finds

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Both President Biden and former President Donald Trump have made public gaffes on the campaign trail. Experts say such slips, on their own, are not cause for concern. Morry Gash/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Morry Gash/Pool/Getty Images

Recent gaffes by Biden and Trump may be signs of normal aging — or may be nothing

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Barbara Green poses for a photo at her home on February 2, 2024 in Falls Church, Virginia. Green, who was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2022, has been urging state lawmakers to legalize physician-assisted death. Shaban Athuman/VPM hide caption

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Shaban Athuman/VPM

Virginia lawmakers consider proposal to legalize physician-assisted death

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Maria Fabrizio

You can order a test to find out your biological age. Is it worth it?

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Maria Fabrizio/NPR

Scientists can tell how fast you're aging. Now, the trick is to slow it down

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