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Vaccine-makers are readying 190 million doses of the flu vaccine for deployment across the U.S. this fall — 20 million more doses than in a typical year. A nasal spray version will be available, as well as shots. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Hundreds of nursing home residents have been transferred as a result of their facilities treating COVID-19 patients only. Joelle Sedlmeyer/Getty Images hide caption

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Joelle Sedlmeyer/Getty Images

Nursing Home Residents Moved Out To Make Way For COVID-19 Patients

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Blood plasma — the yellowish, cell-free portion that remains after red and white blood cells have been filtered out by a machine and returned to the plasma donor — is rich with antibodies. Plasma from recovered COVID-19 patients might prove useful in preventing infection as well as in treatment, scientists say. Lindsey Wasson/Reuters hide caption

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Lindsey Wasson/Reuters

Harvested Antibodies Now Being Tested As A Prevention Tool Against COVID-19

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People wait in line outside a testing site in Florida. The state has seen unprecedented surges in coronavirus cases in recent weeks. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Pandemic Is Overwhelming U.S. Public Health Capacity In Many States. What Now?

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Several lines of evidence now suggest that two common vaccines against respiratory illnesses can help protect against Alzheimer's, too. How much brain protection they offer will require more intensive study to quantify, scientists say. Themba Hadebe/AP hide caption

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Themba Hadebe/AP

Flu Shot And Pneumonia Vaccine Might Reduce Alzheimer's Risk, Research Shows

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Public health officials advise social distancing strategies and masks, in part because the latest evidence suggests that catching the coronavirus, even if you're young, is risky business. A significant portion of COVID-19 survivors suffer fatigue, blood clots, fevers and other symptoms for weeks and months after clearing the infection. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Without A Vaccine, Researchers Say, Herd Immunity May Never Be Achieved

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An evacuee lies on a cot at an evacuation shelter for people with disabilities in Stuart, Fla., in preparation for Hurricane Dorian on Sept. 1, 2019. Now, with the pandemic raging, officials across the South are trying to adjust their evacuation and shelter plans. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

Disaster Relief For The Elderly And Disabled Is Already Hard. Now Add A Pandemic

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Though the pandemic has left us all less able to socialize in person with our close friends and community, we're still finding ways to use screens and other methods to connect and maintain relationships, research suggests. Janice Chang for NPR hide caption

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Janice Chang for NPR

Activity manager Robert Speker worked with residents at England's Sydmar Lodge care home to re-create iconic album covers. Due to COVID-19, residents have been locked down in the facility for months. Screengrab by NPR/Robert Speker on Twitter hide caption

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Screengrab by NPR/Robert Speker on Twitter
Maria Fabrizio for NPR

This image shows the buildup of toxic tau proteins in the medial temporal gyrus of a human brain. Though some drugs can now remove these proteins, that hasn't seemed to ease Alzheimer's symptoms. It's time to look more deeply into how the cells work, scientists say. UW Medicine hide caption

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UW Medicine

Alzheimer's Researchers Go Back To Basics To Find The Best Way Forward

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Taking A Trip To Visit Grandparents Or Older Relatives? Tips To Reduce The Risk

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Mark and Janet Shaver assist Betty Shaver, 96, back to the door at the Mapleshire Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Morgantown, W.Va. Raymond Thompson Jr. for NPR hide caption

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Raymond Thompson Jr. for NPR

Nursing Homes Are Reopening In West Virginia, But Not Everyone Can Visit Yet

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Kelly Womochil, an aide at Enterprise Estates Nursing Center in Enterprise, Kan., tries on a poncho that the Federal Emergency Management Agency is sending to nursing homes to protect against the coronavirus. Pamela Black hide caption

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Pamela Black

Elevator safety measures that take COVID-19 into account are posted at Cambridge Discovery Park, a life sciences office development in Cambridge, Mass. Craig F. Walker/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Craig F. Walker/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Maria Banderas (left) answers questions from medical assistant Dolores Becerra on May 18 before getting a coronavirus test at St. John's Well Child and Family Center in South Los Angeles, one of the LA neighborhoods hit hard by COVID-19. Al Seib/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Seib/LA Times via Getty Images

New Coronavirus Hot Spots Emerge Across South And In California, As Northeast Slows

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Hydroxychloroquine is used to treat autoimmune diseases like lupus and is being studied for use in treating and preventing COVID-19. GEORGE FREY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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GEORGE FREY/AFP via Getty Images

A researcher works in the laboratory of the Amsterdam UMC, in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, 28 May 2020. The team is developing a vaccine against the COVID-19 disease caused by the novel coronavirus. KOEN VAN WEEL/ANP/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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KOEN VAN WEEL/ANP/AFP via Getty Images

The first patient enrolled in Pfizer's COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine clinical trial at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, receives an injection in May. Pfizer's candidate for a coronavirus vaccine is one of number that are in various stages of development around the world. University of Maryland School of Medicine via AP hide caption

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University of Maryland School of Medicine via AP

NIH Director Hopes For At Least 1 Safe And Effective Vaccine By Year's End

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President Trump announced in May that he was taking hydroxychloroquine as a preventive measure against COVID-19. But a study published Wednesday finds no evidence the drug is protective in this way. GEORGE FREY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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GEORGE FREY/AFP via Getty Images

No Evidence Hydroxychloroquine Is Helpful In Preventing COVID-19, Study Finds

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