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Before it closed March 1, the 25-bed Columbia River Hospital, in Celina, Tenn., served the town of 1,500 residents. The closest hospital now is 18 miles from Celina — a 30-minute or more drive on mountain roads. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

Economic Ripples: Hospital Closure Hurts A Town's Ability To Attract Retirees

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Flo Filion Meiler, 84, during pole vault training last month. She mostly works out alone, but has a coach to help refine her technique in events like shot put and high jump. Lisa Rathke/AP hide caption

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Lisa Rathke/AP

Such Great Heights: 84-Year-Old Pole Vaulter Keeps Raising The Bar

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A certified nursing assistant wipes Neva Shinkle's face with chlorhexidine, an antimicrobial wash. Shinkle is a patient at Coventry Court Health Center, a nursing home in Anaheim, Calif., that is part of a multicenter research project aimed at stopping the spread of MRSA and CRE — two types of bacteria resistant to most antibiotics. Heidi de Marco/KHN hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/KHN

Both Democrats and Republicans have introduced proposals that would impose a cap on out-of-pocket costs of prescription drugs for Medicare patients. But it's still unclear whether those moves will gain a foothold. Jeffrey Hamilton/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeffrey Hamilton/Getty Images

A 20-minute nap refreshes. Just don't sleep in so long on Sunday morning that you find it hard to fall asleep Sunday night. Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images hide caption

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Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images

Nappuccinos To Weekend Z's: Strategize To Catch Up On Lost Sleep

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One of the Trump administration's proposals would change the prices Medicare pays for certain prescription drugs by factoring in the average prices Europeans pay for the same medicines. Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

It Will Take More Than Transparency To Reduce Drug Prices, Economists Say

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Various forms of dementia can take very different courses, so it's important to get the right diagnosis. Mehau Kulyk/Science Source hide caption

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Mehau Kulyk/Science Source

Is It Alzheimer's Or Another Dementia? The Right Answer Matters

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Federal records show that the average fine for a health or safety infraction by a nursing home dropped to $28,405 under the Trump administration, down from $41,260 in 2016, President Obama's final year in office. Fancy/Veer/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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Fancy/Veer/Corbis/Getty Images

Robert Neilson, a 76-year-old veteran, is seeking treatment at the San Diego VA after contemplating suicide three years ago. Matt Bowler/KPBS hide caption

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Matt Bowler/KPBS

VA Struggles To Unlock The Reasons Behind High Suicide Rates Among Older Veterans

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For most of us, the benefits of a walk greatly outweigh the risks, doctors say. Get off the couch now. Elena Bandurka /EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Elena Bandurka /EyeEm/Getty Images

Walk Your Dog, But Watch Your Footing: Bone Breaks Are On The Rise

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A screening test for signs of Alzheimer's disease takes only a few minutes, but many doctors don't perform one during older people's annual wellness visits. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

Alzheimer's Screenings Often Left Out Of Seniors' Wellness Exams

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The common practice of double-booking a lead surgeon's time and letting junior physicians supervise and complete some parts of a surgery is safe for most patients, a study of more than 60,000 operations finds. But there may be a small added risk for a subset of patients. Ian Lishman/Getty Images hide caption

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Ian Lishman/Getty Images

Person undergoing a CAT scan in hospital with PET scan equipment. Emerging studies report findings of brain deterioration in females to be slower than that of males'. Johnny Greig/Getty Images hide caption

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Johnny Greig/Getty Images

Scans Show Female Brains Remain Youthful As Male Brains Wind Down

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Client Wanetta Nurse (left) and senior companion Kitty Gee chat about topics like family, the good old days, and men. Patty Wight/Maine Public Radio hide caption

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Patty Wight/Maine Public Radio

Federally Funded Companions Keep Seniors Connected To Their Neighbors

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Belmont University's nursing program started hiring actors like Vickie James to help with their end-of-life simulations for students. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

Morphine, And A Side Of Grief Counseling: Nursing Students Learn How To Handle Death

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Even something as simple as chopping up food on a regular basis can be enough exercise to help protect older people from showing signs of dementia, a new study suggests. BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG/Getty Images

Daily Movement — Even Household Chores — May Boost Brain Health In Elderly

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A migrant worker in a Connecticut apple orchard gets a medical checkup in 2017. A proposed rule by the Trump administration that would prohibit some immigrants who get Medicaid from working legally has already led to a lot of fear and reluctance to sign up for medical care, doctors say. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a speech Thursday to the new Congress that Democrats want "to lower health care costs and prescription drug prices and protect people with pre-existing medical conditions." Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Democrats' Health Care Ambitions Meet The Reality Of Divided Government

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A colorized image of a brain cell from an Alzheimer's patient shows a neurofibrillary tangle (red) inside the cytoplasm (yellow) of the cell. The tangles consist primarily of a protein called tau. SPL/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Science Source

Alzheimer's Disease May Develop Differently In African-Americans, Study Suggests

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