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Increasingly, many people in the U.S., like these teens in a Miami grocery story in August, now routinely wear face masks in public to help stop COVID-19's spread. But social distancing and other public health measures have been slower to catch on, especially among young adults, a national survey finds. Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

On average, each U.S. nursing home is connected to seven others through shared staff, a study by Yale and UCLA researchers suggests. Rigorous infection control measures can curb the spread of the coronavirus, but many workers say they still don't have sufficient masks and other personal protective equipment. SDI Productions/Getty Images hide caption

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They Work In Several Nursing Homes To Eke Out A Living, And That May Spread The Virus

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Researchers say 70% of nursing homes are for-profit, and low staffing is common. Jackyenjoyphotography/Getty Images hide caption

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For-Profit Nursing Homes' Pleas For Government Money Brings Scrutiny

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jimhudspeth_2019s-embed Ryan Lash/Courtesy of TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/Courtesy of TED

Jim Hudspeth: How Do We Hear — And How Do We Lose Our Ability To Hear?

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Is that sneezing or coughing fit a sign of allergies, a cold, the flu or COVID-19? If you also have a fever — a temperature above 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or higher — those symptoms probably signal infection and not just allergies acting up. (Wait 30 minutes after eating or drinking to get an accurate measurement.) sestovic/Getty Images hide caption

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A woman recovering from fever linked to COVID-19 checks medications in her home in Mineola, N.Y., this spring. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Nearly Two-Thirds Of U.S. Households Struck By COVID-19 Face Financial Trouble

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African Americans and other underrepresented minorities make up only about 5% of the people in genetics research studies. janiecbros/Getty Images hide caption

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Neuroscience Has A Whiteness Problem. This Research Project Aims To Fix It

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Dao Thi Hoa, right, chairwoman of the Intergenerational Self Help Club in the Khuong Din ward of Hanoi in Vietnam, checks the club's account book with other members. Nguyễn Văn Hốt hide caption

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Nguyễn Văn Hốt
Jesse Zhang for NPR

A COVID-19 Vaccine May Be Only 50% Effective. Is That Good Enough?

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Kim Ryu for NPR

'I Try So Hard Not To Cry': Nearly Half Of U.S. Households Face A Financial Crisis

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Malaka Gharib/ NPR

How To Care For Older People In The Pandemic (And A Printable Guide!)

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Several influenza vaccines have been made in the form of a nasal spray, instead of an injection. The sprays confer two kinds of immunity to the recipient but can be difficult technologically to make. Tim Sloan /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Sloan /AFP via Getty Images

What A Nasal Spray Vaccine Against COVID-19 Might Do Even Better Than A Shot

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FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn (left), Vice President Mike Pence, and Dr. Ella Grach, CEO of Wake Research, at the NC Biotechnology Center in July, where Phase 3 trials for a coronavirus vaccine candidate are underway. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

COVID-19 Vaccine May Pit Science Against Politics

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When the pandemic hit this spring, U.S. rural hospitals lost an estimated 70% of their income as patients avoided the emergency room, doctor's appointments and elective surgeries. "It was devastating," says Maggie Elehwany of the National Rural Health Association. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A drop-off at a day care last month in the Queens borough of New York City. Lindsey Nicholson/Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Lindsey Nicholson/Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Dr. Deborah Birx speaks to reporters this week outside the Arkansas Governor's Mansion in Little Rock. Birx indicated that data on U.S. COVID-19 hospitalizations will move back to the CDC under a "revolutionary new data system" the agency is developing. Andrew DeMillo/AP hide caption

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Andrew DeMillo/AP

Vaccine-makers are readying 190 million doses of the flu vaccine for deployment across the U.S. this fall — 20 million more doses than in a typical year. A nasal spray version will be available, as well as shots. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Hundreds of nursing home residents have been transferred as a result of their facilities treating COVID-19 patients only. Joelle Sedlmeyer/Getty Images hide caption

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Nursing Home Residents Moved Out To Make Way For COVID-19 Patients

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Blood plasma — the yellowish, cell-free portion that remains after red and white blood cells have been filtered out by a machine and returned to the plasma donor — is rich with antibodies. Plasma from recovered COVID-19 patients might prove useful in preventing infection as well as in treatment, scientists say. Lindsey Wasson/Reuters hide caption

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Lindsey Wasson/Reuters

Harvested Antibodies Now Being Tested As A Prevention Tool Against COVID-19

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People wait in line outside a testing site in Florida. The state has seen unprecedented surges in coronavirus cases in recent weeks. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Pandemic Is Overwhelming U.S. Public Health Capacity In Many States. What Now?

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Several lines of evidence now suggest that two common vaccines against respiratory illnesses can help protect against Alzheimer's, too. How much brain protection they offer will require more intensive study to quantify, scientists say. Themba Hadebe/AP hide caption

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Themba Hadebe/AP

Flu Shot And Pneumonia Vaccine Might Reduce Alzheimer's Risk, Research Shows

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