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Portrait of Phillip Lyn taken by his spouse, Kurt Rehwinkel, outside their home in St. Louis. Kurt Rehwinkel hide caption

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Kurt Rehwinkel

For Those Facing Alzheimer's, A Controversial Drug Offers Hope

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Dr. William Burke goes over a PET brain scan in 2018 at Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix. The drug company Biogen has received federal approval for a medicine to treat early Alzheimer's disease. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

The FDA Has Approved A New Alzheimer's Drug — Here's Why That's Controversial

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Dr. William Burke reviews a PET brain scan at Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix in 2018. An experimental Alzheimer's drug from Biogen and Eisai is on the verge of a Food and Drug Administration decision. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

FDA Poised For Decision On Controversial Alzheimer's Drug

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This microscope image from the National Cancer Institute Center for Cancer Research shows human colon cancer cells with the nuclei stained red. Americans should start getting screened for colon cancer at age 45, according to new guidelines from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. AP hide caption

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AP

After the CDC shifted this week to less restrictive mask guidance for people who have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, some leaders in the public health world felt blindsided. While some people rejoiced, others say they feel the change has come too soon. Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group via Getty Images

John Calhoun of Flathead County has diabetes and was convinced by an old friend to get vaccinated, through he suspects the coronavirus isn't as dangerous as health officials say it is. He's hoping vaccination will ease divisions over masking. Katheryn Houghton/KHN hide caption

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Katheryn Houghton/KHN

Nardo Samson posing with granddaughter Kiara Bautista, May 2017. Jan Daniel Belmonte hide caption

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Jan Daniel Belmonte

Looking For A Bed For Daddy Lolo: Inside The Philippines' COVID Crisis

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Suzanne Simard is a professor of forest ecology at the University of British Columbia. Her own medical journey inspired her research into, among other things, the way yew trees communicate chemically with neighboring trees for their mutual defense. Brendan George Ko/Penguin Random House hide caption

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Brendan George Ko/Penguin Random House

Trees Talk To Each Other. 'Mother Tree' Ecologist Hears Lessons For People, Too

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Medicare Advantage, a fast-growing private alternative to original Medicare, has enrolled more than 26 million people. Humana Inc. is one of the largest of these insurers. While popular with seniors, Medicare Advantage has been the target of multiple government investigations. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Molly Garris, 94, moved in with one of her daughters during the pandemic. The move has meant she's able to enjoy a game of spades, one of her favorite pastimes, with her family, including her grandson-in-law, All Things Considered producer Jason Fuller. Carolyn Dixon hide caption

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Carolyn Dixon

For Seniors Looking To Stay Sharp In The Pandemic, Try A Game Of Spades

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Wajahat Ali: Can Investing In Children Revitalize Economies And Our Humanity?

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President Joe Biden's nearly $2 trillion proposal to support U.S. jobs and infrastructure includes $400 billion to fund the kinds of home-based, long-term health care services and aides that many families have, until now, found unaffordable. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Katie Engelhart details the right-to-die movement in her new book, The Inevitable. She says that many patients in the U.S. are forced to act alone, without telling friends and family, because they fear their loved ones will be prosecuted after the fact. Germán Vogel/Getty Images hide caption

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Germán Vogel/Getty Images

Inside The Fight For The Right To Die: Logistical And Ethical Challenges

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Paul Clarke Photographer +44(0)7515 655932 paul@paulclarke.com/Paul Clarke / TED

Sandrine Thuret: How Can Adults Grow New Brain Cells?

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In early September 2020, Seattle, Wash., had some of the worst air quality in the world because of wildfire smoke. The city was among the first to create smoke shelters for the most vulnerable. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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Nathan Rott/NPR
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A medical worker at South Shore University Hospital gets ready to administer the newly available Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine in Bay Shore, N.Y., Wednesday. Clinical research found it to be 85% effective in preventing severe disease four weeks after vaccination, and it has demonstrated promising indications of protection against a couple of concerning variants of the coronavirus. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Got Questions About Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 Vaccine? We Have Answers

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As a researcher at the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle, Alice Mukora says she understands the need to enroll diverse populations in Alzheimer's research. But that would be more likely to happen, she notes, if people of color had better experiences getting Alzheimer's care. Siri Stafford/Getty Images hide caption

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Siri Stafford/Getty Images

'Providers Don't Even Listen': Barriers To Alzheimer's Care When You're Not White

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