Stream Our 6 Favorite Dance Tracks From March : All Songs Considered Listen to six superb transmissions from the underground, ranging from ambient beats to rugged drum 'n' bass.
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Recommended Dose: Our Favorite Dance Tracks Of March

Recommended Dose: Our Favorite Dance Tracks Of March

Stream Our Entire Mix Or Listen To Individual Songs Below

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From left, London producer IG Culture, and Moscow duo Kamil Ea and Alina Izolenta of PTU. Courtesy of the artists hide caption

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Courtesy of the artists

From left, London producer IG Culture, and Moscow duo Kamil Ea and Alina Izolenta of PTU.

Courtesy of the artists

It goes without saying that we're living in strange times. The primary metaphor for our era — a theater of the absurd — is constantly invoked across the cultural and geographic spectrum. Well... dystopian times call for absurd pleasures. Just don't let it be boring.

One way in which we've long approached making Rx Dose exciting — definitely for us, hopefully for you — is by presenting as diverse a program of electronic and club-minded sounds as we can. It's about different kinds of people, in different kinds of places, making different kinds of music, for different kinds of reasons. (And so on, and so on, and scooby dooby doo...) Even by our own standards this month's lineup — and the individual creative reasonings within it — is far-flung and far out.

Of course, those are just our own attempts at organizing sanity in an insane situation — and maybe the part we are stereotyped to play is the discerning fool who sometimes makes you smile (or at least head-nod, as the case may be). Please reach out to us on Twitter at @Sami_Yenigun (Sami Yenigun), @raspberryjones (Piotr Orlov) and @spotieotis (Otis Hart), to let us know if we're succeeding – or if our part in this strange play needs a rewrite.

Listen To The Tracks

Cover for The Role Of Purity

01Speculation

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Sapphire Slows, 'Speculation' (Nous Disques)

  • from The Role Of Purity

Sapphire Slows is a Tokyo producer whose delicate, melancholy creations are informed by everything from ambient music to J-Pop — and who keeps her birth name far from the press gaze. Slows' debut EP for Berlin's deeply discerning Nous Disques label is the latest extraordinary example of the compositional and techno worlds' cross-pollination, merging into something uniquely contemporary and gorgeous. "Speculation" unfolds beyond its opening synthetic crackles into layers of oscillation, melody and, eventually, a groove that is twee minimalism of the best kind.

The Role of Purity EP is out now on Nous Disques

Cover for Systhema

02Thebe

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Marco Shuttle, 'Thebe' (Spazio Disponibile)

  • from Systhema

Is it the fact that the Trevino-raised Marco Shuttle (née Marco Sartorelli) is Italian — and that the musical community he's formed with fellow produttori musicali Donato Dozzy and Neel is centered on especially personal, idiosyncratic sounds, bringing to mind a techno Nino Rotta? Just try to get through the central melody of "Thebe," (at about 1:10) one of the standouts on Shuttle's sophomore album, without thinking about the more absurd parts of Fellini's films — or "Pink Elephants on Parade." It is both a goofy absurdist stomp and a techno noir interlude.

Systhema will be out on May 9 on Spazio Disponibile

Cover for The Final Experiment

03Outgoing Society

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Shed, 'Outgoing Society' (Monkeytown Records)

  • from The Final Experiment

In a weird way, Shed is the soul of 21st century Berlin techno, while also an island unto himself. It's not just René Pawlowitz's local credentials (Berghain regular; once on the roster of Ostgut Ton, the city's sound-defining label; clerked at Hardwax, its sound-defining record store), it's that his musical output is voluminous, eclectic and consistent. Shed, his longest running moniker, has always been about a marriage of melodies and breakbeats. "Outgoing Society" sounds like a new take on an older Four Tet production — the snapping, rolling drums of a hip-hop loving programmer, the rich chords of a romantic — that reaches far beyond the city's usual musical platitudes.

The Final Experiment is out now on Monkeytown.

Cover for Afrosonique, Vol.1

01Jokenge (IG Culture edit)

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Afro National, 'Jokenge [IG Culture edit]' (Afrosonique Vol 01)

  • from Afrosonique, Vol.1

Not all present-day mixes of rediscovered Afro-Funk records are equal. Though you can always trust IG Culture (London's Ian Grant), who for two decades has been making classic, storming re-edits that build bridges between Europe's broken-beat dancefloors and Africa's rich rhythmic history. 1978's "Jokenge" is a spacious Afrobeat highlight from the Sierra Leone group Afro National, with full-bodied horns, picked guitar and Patricia Koroma's vocals at its foundation. All of which IG tears apart, dusts off, and constructs again in looped bursts, lightly scratching the records into an even more urgent modernity. You wouldn't think Afro National needed the help, but IG Culture really does kick them into Now.

Afrosonique, Vol. 1 will be out May 28 on Africa Seven

Cover for Firepark

02Rohmie Sinkt

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Ryan James Ford, 'Rohmie Sinkt' (SHUT)

  • from Firepark

More new breakbeat techno via Calgary-born Berlin resident (yes, again; yes, still) resident Ford, this one on his own SHUT imprint. Like his prior releases, he tries to split the difference between bass-heavy forward propulsion and jungle- and hardcore-inspired breaks without getting bogged down in either. On "Rohmie Sinkt," the drums deservedly come first, front and center, the hi-hats a stabilizing force, the sci-fi synths coloring the whole. A gorgeous little record.

Firepark EP is out now on SHUT.

Cover for Broken Clock Is Right Twice A Day

02April Theme

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PTU, 'April Theme' (трип)

  • from Broken Clock Is Right Twice A Day

On paper, PTU is the Moscow-based duo of Alina Izolenta and Kamil Ea, who create retro-futurist soundscapes on Soviet-era analog equipment while hopscotching between beats by turns "intelligent" and danceable. In reality, Alina and Kamil are the center of a group of improvisers, students who, in the best Russian intellectual traditions, are not always correct but are also never dull. About a minute into a beat-loop, "April Theme" mutates, like something akin to an Angolan kuduro demo; a mini-monster of a rhythm that takes shape almost accidentally. Meanwhile, everything around it distinctly screams that this isn't the vibe the duo is going for – then the synths perk up again and the sci-fi returns.

A Broken Clock Is Right Twice A Day will be out on April 7 on трип.