Listen To Tune-Yards' New Song 'Look At Your Hands' : All Songs Considered Hosts Bob Boilen and Robin Hilton share Tune-Yards' latest thrill ride, plus a whole lot of guitar noise from Parquet Courts' Andrew Savage, Balmorhea and more.
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Tune-Yards, A. Savage, Balmorhea, More

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New Mix: Tune-Yards, Parquet Courts' A. Savage, Balmorhea, More

New Mix: Tune-Yards, Parquet Courts' A. Savage, Balmorhea, More

Clockwise from upper left: Tune-Yards, Caroline Says, Balmorhea, A. Savage Courtesy of the artists hide caption

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Courtesy of the artists

It'd been more than three years since Tune-Yards released new music, but the singer and multi-instrumentalist Merrill Garbus is back, now as a duo with Nate Brenner. Her new single is a sonic thrill ride called "Look At Your Hands," and it's from her just-announced album, I Can Feel You Creep Into My Private Life (out Jan. 19). Garbus says the new song is a meditation on the mess she feels the world is in and how various political and cultural -isms manifest themselves within her.

Also on the show:

  • Parquet Courts singer and guitarist Andrew Savage has his first-ever solo album out, under the name A. Savage, which features a whole lot of glorious guitar noise.
  • The Austin-based instrumental group Balmorhea makes its own kind of noise using jazz trumpet and ambient textures on the new album Clear Language.
  • Caroline Sallee, another Austin-based musician, has a beautiful debut album out under the name Caroline Says, with layers of ethereal harmonies and delicate melodies.
  • All that plus the remarkable, one-take improvisations of the Australian trio F ingers. The group's new album, Awkwardly Blissing Out, includes the cryptic lyrics of singer Carla Dal Forno, along with heavily processed acoustic guitar and electronics.

Songs Featured On This Episode

Cover for Look At Your Hands

01Look At Your Hands

Tune-Yards

  • Song: Look At Your Hands
  • from Look At Your Hands

Tune-Yards is back as a duo and more brash than ever on the kaleidoscopic new single "Look At Your Hands," ahead of the band's upcoming record I Can Feel You Creep Into My Private Life. "In all the mess I might feel the world is in, I've been attempting to look more and more inward," says Merrill Garbus about the song's origin. "How do all of these 'isms' that we live in manifest in me, in my daily activities, interactions?" I Can Feel You Creep Into My Private Life is due out Jan. 19 on 4AD.

Cover for 50,000,000 Elvis Fans Can't Be Wrong

01Winter Is Cold

Caroline Says

  • Song: Winter Is Cold
  • from 50,000,000 Elvis Fans Can't Be Wrong

Austin-based singer-songwriter Caroline Says' debut cassette 50,000,000 Elvis Fans Can't Be Wrong was inspired by a Greyhound trip up the West Coast. The 2014 tape was recently reissued, ahead of a new studio LP due sometime next year. Singer Caroline Sallee wrote the breezy "Winter Is Cold" while surrounded by cicadas on a hot summer night.

Cover for Clear Language

04Slow Stone

Balmorhea

  • Song: Slow Stone
  • from Clear Language

Another Austin-based act, Balmorhea is an ambient outfit with an all-encompassing sound. On "Slow Stone," the band is joined by Ephraim Owens of the Tedeschi Trucks Band on trumpet. The swelling track was inspired by Miles Davis.

Cover for Awkwardly Blissing Out

02All Rolled Up

F Ingers

  • Song: All Rolled Up
  • from Awkwardly Blissing Out

Though it can be difficult to decipher the lyrics in F Ingers' murky electronic pulse, the atmosphere the trio evokes is transporting. On "All Rolled Up," which was improvised and recorded in one swift, bedroom take, the Australian group channels, among others, Laurie Anderson.

Cover for Thawing Dawn

05What Do I Do

A. Savage

  • Song: What Do I Do
  • from Thawing Dawn

On A. Savage's solo debut album, Thawing Dawn, the Parquet Courts frontman brings his throaty chops to a new set of tracks. "What Do I Do" is his self-proclaimed "uninterrupted black wax" moment, nearly eight minutes of looming, screeching guitar over a persistent groove.