Social Web : All Tech Considered Sites like Facebook and Twitter have revolutionized the Web, altered how we interact with each other and even changed the way news is gathered and delivered. Read about the impact of social media and its continuing evolution.
All Tech Considered

All Tech Considered

Tech, Culture and Connection

Social Web

Lola Omolola is the founder of FIN, a private Facebook group with nearly 1.7 million members that has become a support network for women around the globe. Nolis Anderson for NPR hide caption

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Nolis Anderson for NPR

One Woman's Facebook Success Story: A Support Group For 1.7 Million

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Paul Smith says he wanted "take a page from the Russian playbook" to influence a California congressional campaign. Deanne Fitzmaurice for NPR hide caption

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Deanne Fitzmaurice for NPR

Inspired By Russia, He Bought Influence On Facebook

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An MIT study tracked 126,000 stories and found that false ones were 70 percent more likely to be retweeted than ones that were true. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Can You Believe It? On Twitter, False Stories Are Shared More Widely Than True Ones

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Erica Louie, a YouTuber who goes by Miss Louie, left her corporate job to make fashion videos full time. Denise Tejada/Youth Radio hide caption

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Denise Tejada/Youth Radio

'This Is A Business Now': YouTube Stars Influence Generation Z's Fashion Tastes

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

How Russian Propaganda Spreads On Social Media

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People make their way out of a flooded neighborhood in Houston on Monday. Many people are turning to social media for help. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Facebook, Twitter Replace 911 Calls For Stranded In Houston

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Kyle Quinn, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Arkansas, was wrongly identified on social media as a participant in a white supremacist march in Charlottesville, Va. Jennifer Mortensen hide caption

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Jennifer Mortensen

Kyle Quinn Hid At A Friend's House After Being Misidentified On Twitter As A Racist

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Worshipers at the Walloon Reformed Church of St. Augustine in Magdeburg, Germany, participate in a service where the congregation is encouraged to tweet about the liturgy and share their prayers online. Esme Nicholson/NPR hide caption

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Esme Nicholson/NPR

In Germany, Churchgoers Are Encouraged To Tweet From The Pews

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Google CEO Sundar Pichai talks about the new Google Assistant during a 2016 product event in San Francisco. The voice assistant is one of a number of Google products that will provide user data to the curation service that the company is launching Wednesday. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

With Entry Into Interest Curation, Google Goes Head-To-Head With Facebook

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg (right) speaks with panelists at the Facebook Communities Summit on Thursday in Chicago, where he announced Facebook's mission will change to focus on the activity level of its users. From left are Lola Omolola, Erin Schatteman and Janet Sanchez, who run popular Facebook groups. Teresa Crawford/AP hide caption

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Teresa Crawford/AP

Eli Pariser, CEO of Upworthy, speaks onstage at during the 2014 SXSW Festival in Austin, Texas. At its peak, the site, which is founded on a mission of promoting viral and uplifting content, was reaching close to 90 million people a month. Jon Shapley/Getty Images for SXSW hide caption

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Jon Shapley/Getty Images for SXSW

Upworthy Was One Of The Hottest Sites Ever. You Won't Believe What Happened Next

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Binky is a new social media app where users can scroll, share and like random posts, but all the actions are meaningless. iTunes hide caption

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iTunes

Meet Binky, The Social Media App Where Nothing Matters

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For two years, Hawkins let his app guide him around the globe, including a stop in Gortina, Slovenia. Courtesy of Max Hawkins hide caption

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Courtesy of Max Hawkins

Eager To Burst His Own Bubble, A Techie Made Apps To Randomize His Life

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The Gab.ai home page cites the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Gab.ai/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Gab.ai/Screenshot by NPR

Feeling Sidelined By Mainstream Social Media, Far-Right Users Jump To Gab

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Andrew Knight holds a sign of Pepe the frog, an alt-right icon, during a rally in Berkeley, Calif., on April 27. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

What Pepe The Frog's Death Can Teach Us About The Internet

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