Privacy & Security : All Tech Considered Cloud computing and mobile apps have put the power of the Internet everywhere from our laptops to our pockets, but they also continue to raise concerns about privacy, the security of our personal information and even national security. We explore the ongoing conflicts between convenience and safety.

Mary Guedon of the group Raging Grannies holds a sign as she protests in 2010 outside of the Facebook headquarters in California. Privacy advocates say it's too difficult to fully protect your privacy on Facebook. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Is It Even Possible To Protect Your Privacy On Facebook?

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg walks at the company's headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif., in 2013. NPR asked Americans what steps they take to protect their Facebook data. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Jenn Liv for NPR

An Anarchist Explains How Hackers Could Cause Global Chaos

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Jenn Liv for NPR

This 'Gray Hat' Hacker Breaks Into Your Car — To Prove A Point

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In a federal indictment, Phillip Durachinsky faces numerous charges including installing malware on thousands of computers and the production of child pornography. Cuyahoga County Sheriff's Department hide caption

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Cuyahoga County Sheriff's Department

Ohio Man Charged With Putting Spyware On Thousands of Computers

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Couples now have intertwined digital lives, and so marital problems can lead to spying through specialized apps, keyboard loggers and GPS tracking technology. Roy Scott/Getty Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Getty Images

According to family lawyers, scorned spouses are increasingly turning to GPS trackers and cheap spyware apps to watch an ex. Stuart Kinlough/Getty Images hide caption

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Stuart Kinlough/Getty Images

I Know Where You've Been: Digital Spying And Divorce In The Smartphone Age

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Sean Zadig runs the threat investigations team at Oath, formerly known as Yahoo. He talked about his team's work at the Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity at the University of California, Berkeley in September. Alina Selyukh/NPR hide caption

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Alina Selyukh/NPR

Why Silicon Valley Is Hiring Ex-Federal Agents

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Identity thieves can strip personal information off of public Wi-Fi and your smartphone. Rick Nease/MCT Graphics via Getty Images hide caption

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Rick Nease/MCT Graphics via Getty Images

A laptop in the Netherlands was one of hundreds of thousands infected by ransomware in May. The malware reportedly originated with the NSA. Rob Engelaar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rob Engelaar/AFP/Getty Images

Amazon's Cloud Cam is part of the Amazon Key in-home delivery system, rolling out on Wednesday. Amazon hide caption

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Amazon

As Amazon Looks To Unlock Your Door, Taking Stock Of Meaning Of Privacy

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Phil Schiller, Apple's senior vice president of worldwide marketing, announces features of the new iPhone X on Sept. 12 at the Steve Jobs Theater on the new Apple campus in Cupertino, Calif. The phone's new ability to unlock itself using a scan of its owner's face inspired a strong, divided reaction. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

iPhone X's Face ID Inspires Privacy Worries — But Convenience May Trump Them

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People in the U.S. who want to keep their activity hidden are turning to virtual private networks — but VPNs are often insecure. Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Turning To VPNs For Online Privacy? You Might Be Putting Your Data At Risk

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Gierad Laput, a Ph.D. student at Carnegie Mellon University, demonstrates how his team's universal sensor picks up the sound from a hand-held vacuum. Liz Reid/WESA hide caption

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Liz Reid/WESA

Our Homes May Get Smarter, But Have We Thought It Through?

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Passports and some credit cards have RFID chips that allow information to be read wirelessly. An industry has sprung up to make wallets and other products that block hackers from "skimming" the data. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

There Are Plenty Of RFID-Blocking Products, But Do You Need Them?

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Charles Camiel looks into the camera for a facial recognition test before boarding his JetBlue flight to Aruba at Logan International Airport in Boston. Robin Lubbock/WBUR hide caption

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Robin Lubbock/WBUR

Facial Recognition May Boost Airport Security But Raises Privacy Worries

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It's already difficult to create distance from the technology that surrounds us, but as connectivity increases, it might become impossible to do so. Aleksandar Nakic/Getty Images hide caption

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Aleksandar Nakic/Getty Images

In this photo dated Aug. 23, 2010, Iranian technicians work at the Bushehr nuclear power plant, where Iran had confirmed several personal laptops infected by Stuxnet malware. Ebrahim Norouzi/AP/International Iran Photo Agency hide caption

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Ebrahim Norouzi/AP/International Iran Photo Agency

A screenshot of the warning screen from a purported ransomware attack on a laptop in Beijing. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

From Kill Switch To Bitcoin, 'WannaCry' Showing Signs Of Amateur Flaws

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Microsoft President Brad Smith speaks at the annual Microsoft shareholders meeting on Nov. 30, 2016, in Bellevue, Wash. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Microsoft President Urges Nuclear-Like Limits On Cyberweapons

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A driver uses a phone while behind the wheel of a car on April 30, 2016, in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

'Textalyzer' Aims To Curb Distracted Driving, But What About Privacy?

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Former FBI agent Clint Watts testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Thursday in Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

How Russian Twitter Bots Pumped Out Fake News During The 2016 Election

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