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A 1996 law sits at the heart of a major question about the modern Internet: How much responsibility should fall to online platforms for how their users act and get treated? Oivind Hovland/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Oivind Hovland/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Section 230: A Key Legal Shield For Facebook, Google Is About To Change

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Automating Inequality by Virginia Eubanks Eslah Attar/NPR hide caption

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Eslah Attar/NPR

'Automating Inequality': Algorithms In Public Services Often Fail The Most Vulnerable

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A full-scale figure of a "T-800" terminator robot used in the movie Terminator 2, is displayed at a preview of the Terminator Exhibition in Tokyo in 2009. Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images

Lawmakers: Don't Gauge Artificial Intelligence By What You See In The Movies

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Men look at computers in an Internet bar in Beijing in 2015. Even as the government finds new methods to block virtual private networks, providers find ways to go around the blocks. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images

Behind China's VPN Crackdown, A 'Game Of Cat And Mouse' Continues

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Artificial intelligence poses an existential risk to human civilization, Elon Musk (right) told the National Governors Association meeting Saturday in Providence, R.I. Stephan Savoia/AP hide caption

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Stephan Savoia/AP

The Federal Communications Commission is accepting public comment on its proposal to loosen the "net neutrality" rules placed on Internet providers in 2015. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Internet Companies Plan Online Campaign To Keep Net Neutrality Rules

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"We should be around the world. But we should also be focused on our own backyards," Microsoft President Brad Smith says. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Microsoft Courts Rural America, And Politicians, With High-Speed Internet

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Eighth graders Cristian Munoz (left) and Clifton Steward work on their Chromebooks during a language arts class at French Middle School in Topeka, Kan. Both students were eligible to bring the devices home this summer. Scott Ritter/Courtesy of French Middle School hide caption

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Scott Ritter/Courtesy of French Middle School

Online sales are growing by about 15 percent each year, but states say they're not getting their fair share of taxes from e-commerce. razerbird/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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razerbird/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Massachusetts Tries Something New To Claim Taxes From Online Sales

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In this photo dated Aug. 23, 2010, Iranian technicians work at the Bushehr nuclear power plant, where Iran had confirmed several personal laptops infected by Stuxnet malware. Ebrahim Norouzi/AP/International Iran Photo Agency hide caption

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Ebrahim Norouzi/AP/International Iran Photo Agency

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai has started the process to roll back Obama-era regulations for Internet service providers. Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Emily Bogle/NPR

FCC Chief Makes Case For Tackling Net Neutrality Violations 'After The Fact'

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Paulo Melo is a global entrepreneur-in-residence at the University of Massachusetts-Boston. This visa workaround allowed Melo, originally from Portugal, to legally stay in the United States and build his business in Massachusetts. Asma Khalid/Asma Khalid/WBUR hide caption

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Asma Khalid/Asma Khalid/WBUR

Without A Special Visa, Foreign Startup Founders Turn To A Workaround

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Both chambers of the U.S. Congress have voted to overturn the Federal Communications Commission's privacy rules for Internet service providers. Stefan Zaklin/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Zaklin/Getty Images

The New Orleans Police Department was one of the first big police departments in the U.S. to embrace the use of body cameras. Sean Gardner/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gardner/Getty Images

New Orleans' Police Use Of Body Cameras Brings Benefits And New Burdens

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U.S. lawmakers are once again weighing changes to the popular but troubled H-1B work visa. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Trump May Weigh In On H-1B Visas, But Major Reform Depends On Congress

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